Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Satellite & Space Missions Barcelona, Spain.

Day 2 :

Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Nicolas H. Younan photo
Biography:

Nicolas H. Younan is currently the Department Head and James Worth Bagley Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Mississippi State University. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from Mississippi State University, in 1982 and 1984, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from Ohio University in 1988. Dr. Younan’s research interests include signal processing and pattern recognition. He has been involved in the development of advanced signal processing and pattern recognition algorithms for data mining, data fusion, feature extraction and classification, and automatic target recognition/identification. He has published over 250 papers in refereed journals and conference proceedings, and book chapters. He served as the General Chair and Editor for the 4th IASTED International Conference on Signal and Image Processing, Co-Editor for the 3rd International Workshop on the Analysis of Multi-Temporal Remote Sensing Images, Guest Editor -  Pattern Recognition Letters and JSTARS, and Co-Chair - Workshop on Pattern Recognition for Remote sensing (2008-2010)..

Abstract:

Satellite precipitation estimation at high spatial and temporal resolutions is beneficial for research and applications in the areas of weather, flood forecasting, hydrology, and agriculture. In this presentation, we incorporate advanced image processing and pattern recognition tools into the Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks Cloud Classification System (PERSIANN-CCS) methodology to enhance satellite precipitation and rainfall estimation. The enhanced algorithm incorporates five main steps to derive precipitation estimates: 1) segmenting the satellite infrared cloud images into patches, 2) extracting features from the segmented cloud patches, 3) feature selection or dimensionality reduction, 4) categorizing the cloud patches into separate groups, and 5) obtaining a relationship between the brightness temperature of cloud patches and the rain- rate (T-R) for every cluster. In addition to the features utilized for cloud patch classification, wavelet and lightning features are also extracted. Both feature selection and dimensionality reduction techniques are used to reduce the dimensionality as well as diminish the effects of the redundant and irrelevant features.  A variety of feature selection techniques, such as Feature Similarity Selection and a Filter-Based Feature Selection using Genetic Algorithm are examined and the Entropy Index (EI) fitness function is used to evaluate the feature subsets. Furthermore, Independent Component Analysis was examined and compared to other linear and nonlinear unsupervised dimensionality reduction techniques to reduce the dimensionality and increase the estimation performance. The results show that the enhanced algorithm incorporating the above techniques improves precipitation estimation.

Keynote Forum

Bo Huang

Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hong Kong

Keynote: Unified Satellite Image Fusion for Sustainable Urban Environment
Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bo Huang photo
Biography:

Bo Huang is a Professor in the Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, where he is also the Associate Director of Institute of Space and Earth Information Science and the Director of MSc Program in GeoInformation Science. He received Changjiang Scholar Chair Professorship, the highest academic award issued to an individual in higher education by the Ministry of Education of PR China. Dr. Huang’s research interest focuses on geographical information science and he has published extensively in this field, including over 100 refereed international journal articles. He currently serves as the Asia-Pacific Editor of International Journal of Geographical Information Science (Taylor & Francis). In recent years he has been exploring along the line of unified remote sensing image fusion, convinced that this new paradigm will revolutionize the way how remote sensing data are integrated, analyzed and utilized in the future.

Abstract:

The recent decades have witnessed the launch of a large number of orbiting satellite sensors with different spatial, temporal, spectral, and angular (STSA) characteristics, resulting in dramatic improvements in the ability to acquire images of the Earth surface, and a boom in remote sensing (RS) applications in environmental, ecological, and disaster monitoring. However, current RS technology cannot meet the requirement of monitoring dense and dynamic urban environments with complex structures and changes that require high spatial detail, frequent coverage, fine spectral resolution, and multi-angle observation. This is largely due to the fact that there is no satellite sensor that can achieve simultaneously high STSA resolution. Unified satellite image fusion aims to circumvent this obstacle by achieving high resolution with respect to all the image properties for a virtual satellite sensor. The generated high STSA resolution imagery can greatly contribute to the exploration and improvement of existing satellite image resources for urban environmental applications by detecting more details in a more accurate manner. This presentation will introduce to you the speaker’s endeavors along this line of research, including both the methodologies and applications in environmental and land use monitoring.

Keynote Forum

Ryspek Usubamatov

Kyrgyz State Technical University

Keynote: Fundamental principles of gyroscope theory
Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ryspek Usubamatov photo
Biography:

Ryspek Usubamatov has graduated as professional engineer, completed Ph.D from Bauman Moscow State Technical University and Doctor of Technical Sciences from Academy of Sciences of Kyrgyzstan. He worked as an engineer-designer of machine tools at engineering company. He is a professor of Kyrgyz State Technical University and worked at universities in Malaysia. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals, more than 60 patents of inventions in engineering and seven books in area of manufacturing engineering. He supervised six Ph.D and several dozens of MSc. students. His research interests in area of Gyroscope theory and Productivity theory for Industrial Engineering.

Abstract:

Gyroscope devices are primary units for navigation and control systems in aviation, space, ships, and other industries. The main property of the gyroscope device is maintaining the axis of a spinning rotor for which mathematical models have been formulated on the law of kinetic energy conservation and the changes in the angular momentum. However, known mathematical models for the gyroscope effects do not match actual forces and motions underway. The nature of the gyroscope properties is more complex than is represented by contemporary theories. Recent investigations have demonstrated that gyroscopes have four inertial forces interdependently and simultaneously acting on them. These forces are internal kinetic energies generated by the mass-elements and centre-mass of the spinning rotor and represented by centrifugal, Coriolis, and common inertial forces as well as changes in angular momentum. The applied torque generates internal resistance torques that based on action of centrifugal and Coriolis forces; and the precession torques generated by common inertial forces and by the change in the angular momentum. Apart these, the friction forces acting on the gyroscope supports play considerable role in decreasing the internal kinetic energy of the spinning rotor. The new mathematical models for gyroscope effects describe clearly and exactly all known and new gyroscope properties. Mathematical models for the most unsolvable motions of the gyroscope with one side support are validated by practical tests. Formulated models for motions of the gyroscope represent fundamental principles of gyroscope theory based on the actions of internal centrifugal, Coriolis and inertial forces and the change in angular momentum, and external applied and friction forces. This new theoretical approach for the gyroscope problems represents new challenge in engineering science.

  • Track 2: Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS | Track 4: Earthquake Engineering | Track 5: Aerospace Engineering and Technology | Track 09: Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) | Track 11: Space Weather | Track 14: Orbital Mechanics

Session Introduction

Title: Speaker Slots Available
Biography:

15 More Speaker Slots Available

 

Submit your abstract and confirm your Speaker slot at Satellite-2017. All proposals must be submitted to satellite@conferenceseries.net


 

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Vanessa M. Escobar is NASA’s Deputy Applications Coordinator for the recently launched SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission and for the ICESat-2 Mission.  Ms. Escobar also leads the science and stakeholder applications for NASA’s Carbon Monitoring Systems Initiative at Goddard Space Flight Center.  She facilitates and translates discussions across scientific and political boundaries related to water resource management, risk, hydrology, remote sensing, public policy, carbon science and decision support frameworks. Her research is geared towards analysing the sensitivity of earth science data in operational modelling systems, evaluating the value of information in decision support structures and applying that knowledge to areas of societal benefit.  Ms. Escobar works closely with the emergency response community, the reinsurance community and the wine/viticulture industry to help scale and improve the use of remote sensing observations for efficient use of resources and business management practices.

Abstract:

Satellite remote sensing technology has contributed to the transformation of multiple earth science domains, putting space observations at the forefront of innovation in Earth Science. With new satellite missions being launched every year, new types of Earth Science data are being incorporated into science models and decision-making systems in a broad array of organizations. These applications help hazard mitigation and decision-making in government, private, and civic institutions working to reduce its impact on human wellbeing.  Policy guidance and knowledge of product maturity can influence mission design as well as development of product applications in user organizations. Ensuring that satellite missions serve both the scientific and user communities without becoming unfocused and overly expensive is a critical outcome from engagement of user communities.

 

Tracking the applications and product maturity help improve the use of data.  NASA’s Applications Readiness Levels reduce cost and increase the confidence in applications. ARLs help identify areas where NASA products are most useful while allowing the user to leverage products in early development as well as those ready for operational uses.  By considering the needs of the user community early on in the mission-design process, agencies can use ARLs to ensure that satellites meet the needs of multiple constituencies and the development of products are integrated into user organizations organically. ARLs and user integration provide a perspective on the maturity and readiness of a products ability to influence policy and decision-making.

This paper describes the mission application development process at NASA and within the Earth Science Directorate.  We present the successes and challenges faced by NASA data users and explain how ARLs helps link NASA science to the appropriate policies and decision frameworks.  The methods presented here can be adapted to other programs and institutions seeking to rapidly move scientific research to applications that have societal impact.

Speaker
Biography:

Jasmin Belle-Isle is a canadian family doctor. He is a Principal Investigator in medical research and working for Alpha Research in Quebec city, Canada. His reputation in medical research is very well established in North America. Even though he's a doctor, his passion is Astrophysic and every free moment is an opportunity to read, think, imagine and elaborate on his theory about physics and the Universe.

Abstract:

The search for truth and the true face of the Universe is a constant preoccupation for many scientists. After all, knowing the Universe better in the end, means knowing more about ourselves and others. I propose a vision in respect with science and actual laws of physics that will reveal the reality that has permitted the emergence and propagation of life and is called : The Universe

Astronomers launched many satellites over the past years including COBE in 1989, WMAP in 2001, and PLANK in 2009. Theses satellites observed the Universe while it was only 380,000 years old and further improved the precision of previous results. Some evidential findings emerged from these observations including the temperature of the Universe exactly 2.725 above absolute zero acting like a ''Black Body'' and the calculation by inference of a so called ''Dark Energy''. Theses observations and thoses made by Alexander Friedman, Georges Lemaître, Edwin Hubble, Arno Penzias and Robert W. Wilson support the theory that a big explosion took place some 13,7 billion years ago and has given birth to the Universe and is called : The Big Bang. This huge amount of pure energy then spreaded in a space not yet present. How this energy spreaded in the Universe ?

Einstein once said that matter is energy and energy is light and that we were all light beings. How energy could be matter and light at the same time ? My theory answer this question. My theory put the photon at the center of the Universe and is a big step toward the ''Theory of Everything'' so sought by scientists like Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking. It could even reveal where hide theses mysterious constituents of the Universe called ''Dark Matter'' and ''Dark Energy'', mystery of the millenium.

Speaker
Biography:

Ruth Bamford has been a research scientist at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in Oxfordshire in the U.K. since 1996. Her research areas include Space Weather and fundamental plasma physics. Her particular emphasis is on kinetic effects in plasmas. She is the principle investigator of the Mini-Magnetospheric project for space craft protection. The concept concerns ‘Active’ or electromagnetic plasma shielding of manned spacecraft for long stay and interplanetary missions, and satellites in radiation belts. Prior to working at RAL, Ruth spent 10 years at the home of what is currently the world’s largest “tokamak”, JET, at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE) in Oxfordshire.  She gained her 1st Class Honours in Applied Physics from the University of Sunderland in 1988 and her PhD from the Uni. Of Essex. She worked as a post-doc of Imperial Collage, London before moving in 1996 to work on space plasmas.

Abstract:

Spacecraft in interplanetary space and the radiation belts are vulnerable to `cosmic rays’. Solar storms produce large numbers of energetic ions and electrons that can penetrate and disrupt solar panels, electronics and human tissue. Due to their larger mass, the energetic ions are the greater hazard as they are not easily stopped. Thick material cladding around vulnerable parts of the vessel provides diminishing effectiveness at the higher energies.

Ideas of electromagnetically deflecting the energetic charged particles fall down due to unrealistically high power requirements needed to create the size of electromagnetic field thought to be needed. Proponents over the years have focused on optimising the engineering on board the spacecraft. Until recently nobody has reexamined how the particles interact with the magnetic or electric field. It is assumed to be straightforward. However, laboratory experiments and theory have shown that this is not simple. The presence of the diffuse solar wind makes for a far more efficient shield than single particles dynamics would predict.

 

The question then becomes: how does this change the potential for effective active shielding for manned interplanetary spacecraft and/or satellites in the radiation belt?

 

What we find is for a manned mission to Mars of ~20kW of on-board power being redirected to superconducting magnetic coils system weighing approximately 3000 kg including cooling. This would reduce the energetic (> 50MeV) particle flux by about 20% during a major solar storm (assuming a severe solar storm flux of ~1010 protons/cm2sec). Additional augmentations, such as adding extra plasma into the bubble, can greatly enhance its effectiveness up to 80 to 90% exclusion overall and the extend the range of energies capable of being deflected.

Evidence that these principles will be presented from laboratory and space from the natural magnetic shielding occurring on the Moon.

Speaker
Biography:

Francisco J. Arias is a Reader in  Fluid Mechanics   and Nuclear Energy at the University of Catalunya-BarcelonaTech. He received his BA in Physics  from University of Barcelona and his BA in Material Engineering at University of Catalunya-BarcelonaTech where also  obtained his PhD in Nuclear Engineering. He was subsequently  elected to a Research  Fulbright fellowship at University of California at Berkeley  (UCB) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)  at USA. After, he gained the Beatriu de Pinos fellowship  for Catalunya governement,   working at the National University of Australia -University of Tasmania and finally at the University of Cambridge (UK) where currently continues as collaborator in several research projects, and the became a Senior Research Associated at University of Catalunya-BarcelonaTech. Arias researches into the application of advanced  energy concepts  in solar, nuclear and  marine energy.  He also works with alternative concepts for space applications, rocket  and planetary science.            

Abstract:

Nowadays, Mars Entry Descent and Landing Systems (EDLS) technology dates back to NASA’s Viking which are based on the traditional heatshield/parachute combination and on the use of inflatable or retro-thrusters technologies.

On the other hand, the essential Viking parachute design has been used ever since — and was employed again in 2012 to deliver the Curiosity rover to Mars. Unfortunately, because the low density of the Martian atmosphere, the use of parachutes is not enough, and it is necessary the use of retro-thrusters or inflatable airbags. This stage is the most challenging stage during the entire Martian mission, and is where failures occur. Indeed, the most recent failure in the exploration of Mars, the ExoMars Schiaparelli module by the European Space Agency (ESA) ended up following its descent on 19 October this year, was lost in final minutes of descent, because failure in the retro-thrusters time control system. One possible alternative to avoid or at least to mitigate the dependence on the use of retro-thrusters or inflatable airbags is by developing new drag enhancement devices. These new drag devices may be one of the first steps on the technology path to potentially landing humans, habitats, and their return rockets safely on Mars.

Since 2015, the University of Catalonia, Spain, in collaboration with University of Cambridge have developed a novel, simple, and reliable concept for decreasing the ballistic coefficient of the spacecraft.

In this work, it will be presented for first time the preliminary results of te concept to the scientific and engineering community. Where the theoretical background, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations, Laboratory testing, and a mock-up model tested at free fall where used. The preliminary results are highly encouraging where it is shown that ballistic coefficient can effectively be reduced at least up to 20 times its initial value.

Speaker
Biography:

Hooshang Asadi Haroni holds BSc degrees in Geology, and MSc and PhD in Mineral Exploration at ITC and Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. He worked for three years as exploration geologist and GIS database analyst at the international mining company of “Rio Tinto Mining and Exploration Limited. He is now an Assistant Professor in the Mining Department of Isfahan University of Technology in Iran. In addition, since 2013, he has been appointed as adjunct senior researcher in the Centre for Exploration targeting (CET), University of Western Australia (UWA).

Abstract:

Muteh gold mining area is located in 160 km NW of Isfahan town in the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone of central Tethyan belt in Iran. Muteh is the oldest active gold mine in Iran. Gold mineralization at Muteh is orogenic type in origin and is associated with fractured metamorphosed rocks such as metarhyolites showing hydrothermal clay alterations, silicification, carbonatization as well as iron oxides such as hematite and goethite (Moritz et al., 2006). Image processing and interpretation were applied on the ASTER satellite imagery data (Beiranvand and Hashim, 2011) of about 400 km2 at the Muteh gold mining area to identify important hydrothermal alteration minerals and iron oxides associated with gold mineralization. After applying preprocessing methods such as radiometric and geometric corrections, image processing methods such as false colored composite FCC), principal components analysis (PCA), least square-Fit (Ls-Fit) and spectral angle mapper (SAM) were applied on the ASTER imagery data to identify hydrothermal alteration minerals and iron oxides (Asadi and Lavafan,  2007; Asadi et al., 2007) . In this research, reference spectra of important minerals such as chlorite, hematite, goethite, quartz and clay minerals such as kaolinite, illite, smictite and phengite, identified from laboratory spectral analyses of collected samples of the Muteh gold mining area measured at the GEOSENSE company in the Netherlands, were resampled to ASTER band position (Moore et al., 2008), and then used to map several zones the known and unknown hydrothermal clay alterations, silicification and iron oxides in the Muteh and surrounding Muteh gold mining areas. This study identified four known gold mineralized areas of Senjedeh, Cheh Khatun, Chah Allameh and Chah Ghorom in the Muteh gold mining area. In addition, several other important targets showing similar important minerals were identified in the surrounding Muteh gold mining area. Finally, identified zones of the hydrothermal alteration minerals and iron oxides were validated by visiting and sampling them in field, and three targets, showing gold and associated arsenic and antimony mineralization, were suggested for future exploration.

Speaker
Biography:

Giulio Avanzini is Professor in Flight Mechanics at the Università del Salento, where he teaches Fundamentals of Aerospace Engineering (B.Eng), Flight Mechanics and Aircraft Design (M.Sc). He served as assistant professor at the Politecnico di Torino for 13 years (1998-2011), teaching courses on Atmospheric and Space Flight Mechanics. He was visiting professor at the University of Glasgow and University of Illinois at Urbana Champaing. He obtained a Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics and a Laurea degree summa cum laude in Aeronautical Engineering from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. His research activity spans various fields of atmospheric and space flight mechanics: analysis of aircraft dynamics in nonlinear flight regimes; aircraft, rotorcraft and spacecraft inverse simulation; fixed and rotary wing aircraft dynamics; autonomous flight and uninhabited aerial vehicles; spacecraft attitude dynamics and control; satellite formation flight; fundamental problems in orbit dynamics and space mission analysis; analysis of flying qualities of entry vehicles.

Abstract:

A spacecraft is in underactuated conditions when three rotational degrees of freedom need to be controlled by means of actuators, delivering control torque components around two non-collinear axes only. This condition can be the consequence of an actuator failure, when the satellite is equipped with a non-redundant system or multiple failures, for redundant ones. It can also be a natural condition for spacecraft equipped with magnetic actuators, which can deliver a control torque, which lies on a plane perpendicular to the direction of the local geomagnetic field. Since it is not possible to simultaneously control attitude and angular speed of a rigid body with two control torque components by means of a continuous time-invariant feedback, the problem of attitude stabilization and control becomes significantly more difficult.

Discontinuous control approaches (e.g. switching control logics [2, 3]) as well as time-varying controllers [4, 5] has been proposed. In the paper, a review of these techniques will be proposed and a focus will be placed on kinematic approaches, developed by the author in cooperation with Fabrizio Giulietti, from University of Bologna, and other collaborators. The kinematic approach allows for tackling many control problems for underactuated spacecraft by means of controllers, which are at one time very efficient in terms of required computational effort and effective in terms of convergence time. The results for various operational scenarios, such as detumbling by means of magnetic actuators only [6], or pointing of an axis in an arbitrary direction by means of only two reaction wheels will [7] be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Emilio Ramírez-Juidías, graduated in Agricultural Engineering in 1998, is tenured lecturer in Graphic Engineering Department at University of Seville. He holds a Msc. in Water Engineering and a Msc. in Astronomy & Astrophysic, and completed his PhD in Engineering in 2010, The main subject of his investigations is remote sensing applied to environmental sciences and solar physic. Prof. Emilio Ramírez is author of more than 40 books, more than 30 articles and holds six patents in different topics (remote sensing and engineering) He is member of Spanish Royal Physics Society and member of editorial board of several indexed journals.

Abstract:

Both climatic factors and the dynamics of pollutants in the atmosphere are two important factors in studying the possible causes of increased rates of atmospheric pollutants in relation to the moisture of the canopy, as well as with the industrial activities existing in the study area. The city of Almadén (Ciudad Real, Spain) declared a World heritage site on June 30, 2012, is a good example of mutual relationship of sustainability existing between the eco-design of its urban design and its historical and industrial heritage, giving rise to a very peculiar landscape evolution. In this city, historical mining activity has caused a strong impact on the environment. With the development of image processing techniques, and use of a new procedure patented by the author, applied to the high resolution aerial images of the National Geographic Institute of Spain from 2004 to 2013, it is possible to obtain different results that show how the environmental sustainability of the city allows recognizing and evaluating the phenomena responsible for the increase or decrease of the atmospheric mercury concentration in Almadén. In conclusion, it can be considered that although atmospheric mercury rates are low throughout the Almadén district, it is necessary to consider the cumulative effect of both temperature and precipitation in the system since, through the relative humidity, they are responsible for the increase or decrease in atmospheric mercury concentration.

Speaker
Biography:

Catherine Doldirina is an independent consultant on matters related to legal issues regarding access to and use of data. Previously she worked as a researcher at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (Italy) is focusing on policies and regulations regarding access to and use of geographic and Earth observation data. Her expertise is strongly linked to the research for her PhD thesis “Remote Sensing Data and the Common Good” that she wrote at the Institute of Air & Space Law, Faculty of Law McGill University. Her expertise lies in the field of intellectual property law some fields of European law, (geographic) data policies and regulations, as well as general questions of space law. She lectures on European competition law, European copyright law and space law. She authors work on various aspects of space law and is a member of the International Institute of Space Law.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Satellite remote sensing (RS) data represent a growing and valuable resource for many scientific, research and practical applications carried out by users around the world. Access to RS data for some applications or activities, like climate change research or emergency response activities, becomes indispensable for their success. However, often RS data or products made of them are (or are claimed to be) subject to intellectual property law protection and are licensed under specific conditions regarding access and use. Restrictive conditions on data use can be prohibitive for further work with the data. Taking into account the specificities of RS data the author will highlight complex regulatory environment – various legal norms applicable to RS data that impact the ability to access and use them.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The primary tool of author's research is comparative analysis of regulatory and other sources that determine scope and boundaries of protection applicable to RS data. Primarily relevant norms of international law, as well as European law (both the EU and Member States' regulatory sources) and the US law and policies are used. Occasionally recourse to examples from other jurisdictions is made.

Conclusion & Significance: The author seeks to emphasize potential and actual difficulties that arise from the application of various protection regimes to RS data, particularly regarding restrictions on access to and use of RS data by various users in different countries and for diverse purposes.

Jean-Marc Astorg

National Center for Space Studies (CNES)
France

Title: The panorama of European launchers and their evolution
Speaker
Biography:

Jean-Marc ASTORG is a Launch Vehicles Directorate. He was graduated from the Ecole Centrale des Arts et Manufactures in 1985. He joined the CNES Launch Vehicles Directorate and held various managerial positions in the field of European launchers, responsible alternately for programmes that were preparing the future or for developing launchers. From 1991 to 1998 he supervised the studies for the new version ARIANE 5ECA, and the small Vega launcher. In 1998, he became project leader for development of the new ESC-A upper stage of ARIANE 5 (from development to qualification). He also directed the ‘Soyuz in French Guiana’ project, from 2003 to the successful first launch in 2011. In 2011, he was appointed CNES Director of Procurement, Sales and Legal Affairs. He was also CNES Director in charge of Intellectual Property, and CNES Mediator for relations with SMEs. Since 2015, he is Head of the CNES Launch Vehicles Directorate.

Abstract:

Currently, Arianespace operates three launch vehicles from the Guiana Space Centre:

  • The heavy-lift launcher Ariane 5, which entered into service in 1996, has so far achieved 77 successful launches in a row since 2002. It is designed to place two heavy telecommunications satellites into geostationary transfer orbit.
  • The medium-lift launcher Soyuz ST, for which Europe built a launch complex in French Guiana following the cooperation agreement signed with Russia in 2003. Operational since 2011, it has performed 16 launches from the Guiana Space Centre, and is fundamentally purposed to launch the Galileo satellite navigation constellation and other European institutional satellites (Earth observation, science).
  • The lightweight Vega, whose development in 1997 was strongly advocated by Italy, realized its maiden flight in 2012 and has had nine successful launches since then. The Vega rocket is specifically designed to launch commercial or scientific missions with a mass lower than 1.5 tonnes in Low Earth Orbit.

With this array of launch vehicles, Arianespace currently enjoys the availability of a fleet covering almost the full spectrum of the launch market in terms of both mass and orbits. The company remains the leading service provider on the open commercial market.

However, owing to the development of new launch vehicles throughout the world, in recent years the launch service sector has indeed witnessed a hardening of competition. Therefore, the ESA Ministerial Conference of December 2014 eventually took some important decisions intended to provide Arianespace with the necessary tools to better cope with the increasing global competition: an upgraded launcher – Ariane 6 – that will be 50% cheaper than Ariane 5, and a guaranteed market of five institutional launches per year at European level. At the Ministerial, ESA Member States also decided to proceed with the development of a new version of the Vega rocket: named Vega-C, it will be more efficient and will better meet the market needs of European small satellites. Ariane 6 and Vega C will make use of a common engine to reduce costs.

The Ariane 6 programme is under development with a scheduled maiden flight in 2020.

Although with Ariane 6 and Vega C, Europe will posses a range of advanced and cost-effective launch vehicles, the current pressures to reduce costs for accessing space are likely to remain a major trend in the long run. Therefore, the ESA Ministerial Conference of December 2016 also decided to fund the development of a low cost engine dubbed Prometheus that could equip the Ariane 6 evolutions either in an expandable or reusable mode

Speaker
Biography:

Stijn Calders is project manager with a strong expertise in IT engineering and space physics. He is employed at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy to work on space weather services. Space weather is the influence of solar electromagnetic and particle radiation, galactic cosmic rays, and the radiation belts, on satellites, technology, and human health on Earth and in space (e.g. GPS navigation, communication, astronauts...).

His main duty today is the technical project management of ESA's "SPENVIS Next Generation" (SPENVIS-NG) project. The key objective of the project is to upgrade the current SPENVIS system (https://www.spenvis.oma.be) into a new web-based, service-oriented & distributed framework supporting plug-in of models related to the hazardous space environment, and including both a user friendly interface for rapid analysis and a machine-to-machine interface for interoperability with other software tools (e.g. SEISOP).

Abstract:

Modelling the space environment

On the ground we are well shielded from the space weather environment by our planet’s atmosphere and its magnetic field. However, satellites and astronauts are directly exposed to its hazardous effects. The danger becomes increasingly more substantial when moving away from Earth’s protection e.g. a spacecraft mission through the harsh radiation environment of Jupiter and its moons or a future manned missions to Mars. 

SPENVIS (https://www.spenvis.oma.be) is a web application that allows someone to model the space environment (i.e. cosmic rays, radiation belts, solar energetic particles, plasmas, outgassing and micro-particles) around Mercury, Earth, Mars and Jupiter but also in the interplanetary medium. In addition, it enables to calculate the potential effects of these environments on spacecraft components and astronauts.

SPENVIS: a long and acclaimed history

Since its first development by the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) in 1996, it has been a successful ESA operational software for more than fifteen years. In the recent years, SPENVIS has also been integrated in ESA’s Space Situational Awareness (SSA, http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Space_Situational_Awareness) Space Weather Service Network. As a result, SPENVIS has established a mature user community from all over the globe that is using the system for various purposes including mission analysis and planning, education and scientific research.

Lately, a new system known as SPENVIS Next Generation (http://www.spenvis-ng.eu/) has been developed under ESA’s GSTP-5 programme by an international consortium led by the space weather section of BIRA-IASB. The new system has a distributed architecture, uses standards to integrate models and supports the integration to other software by offering a web interface as well as an application programmer’s interface (API).

Jihun Kim

Korea Astronomy & Space Science Institute
Korea

Title: Current status of development of solar coronagraph system
Speaker
Biography:

Jihun has completed his PhD in 2013 and postdoctoral studies from College of Optical Science and Engineering in University of Arizona. Currently he is the senior researcher in Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) and working on Solar Coronagraph which will be built on International Space Station (ISS). He has been involved to various telescope projects including ground-based and space telescope. His expertise is in optical designing, testing, and performance evaluation. He also has been performed simulations of Adaptive Optics (AO) of ground-based telescope.

Abstract:

Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) has been developing the Solar Coronagraph system which will be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2021(Figure1). We have adapted and studied the compact coronagraph system proposed by NASA. We have developed a prototype of the compact coronagraph in which we can observe the solar coronagraph without the occulters. It was used for the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) observation in 2016. Even we could not obtain the satisfactory result in the observation due to poor environment, we could obtain lessens and learns. We have a plan to develop another prototype of coronagraph system to test filter wheel, polarizer, and CCD, and it will be used for the Total Solar Eclipse in 2017. After the TSE observation, we have a plan to develop the coronagraph system used in the balloon air-borne to demonstrate for the space model. In this poster we introduce the progress and current status of the project and focus on optical design works for Total Solar Eclipse (TSE) observation.

Speaker
Biography:

Junhui Meng has his expertise in design and mechanical properties analysis in stratospheric airship or satellite. He and his partners in the Advanced Aircraft Research Center of Beihang University designed China's first stratospheric airship and completed its flight test successfully. He developed the dynamic model of their stratospheric airship and simulate the whole ascending processes. After the flight test, he turn his research in the other direction to study the coupling effects of thermal and mechanical performances. 

Abstract:

The stratospheric satellite has attracted much attention due to its potential application in military and economy. In order to fulfill the tasks of a tethered stratospheric satellite, ascending process is an essential part of ballooning. During ascending, the lifting force is very sensitive to thermal effect. Both the balloon itself and the environment conditions affect ascending process. Among those factors, launch conditions are of vital importance due to their controllability. The initial launch conditions were classified into three types: inflating quantity, launch time and launch position. The ascending velocity and the differential pressure were defined and used as evaluation parameters of flight performance. To achieve better ascent performance, proper choices of launch conditions are required in the satellite mission preparation. In this paper, a novel dynamic model with thermal effects is addressed to describe thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of the stratospheric satellite. Based on the model, ascending processes of a tethered stratospheric satellite under different initial launch conditions were simulated. Based on the dynamic simulation, influences of the trajectory control system on meridional migration of the stratospheric satellite are analyzed. It improves the controllability and security of the stratospheric satellite effectively. By using the iterative calculation of multi-body dynamics system, the equilibrium point of the stratospheric satellite is received. The computational accuracy is improved and the computational quantity is reduced enormously by setting initial values of several parameters in advance. Results showed that the inflating quantity is the most effective factor for ascending process, and the upper and lower limits were also proposed separately from safety and performance perspectives. For both launch time and launch location conditions, different solar radiation is the main effect approach during ascending process. Specifically, the influence mechanism of launch time in one day and launch longitude are completely identical due to the Earth’s rotation.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Jianbo LIU, Research professor and deputy director of Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences. He specializes in satellite remote sensing image processing and data management. He has more than 20 years experience in satellite remote sensing ground station construction, operation, and management. He proposed and develops a virtual ground station system which can provide near real time, full resolution satellite image to users. This system is installed in a few countries to help their needs for quick monitoring and response.

Abstract:

This presentation introduces major Chinese satellites program, including satellite classification, specification, timeline, and ground station system. On second part, it introduces a virtual ground station technology. It presents some disadvantages of the current remote sensing data distribution mode and proposes a new way to access remote sensing satellite image. The new way, by making use of strong capacity nowadays, transfer, calculate, and compress the remote sensing data immediately after data reception from a satellite, and provide the image in near real-time to users. The major functions include full resolution, overlaid with vector data such as longitude/latitude and administrative name, image zooming/panning, satellite/sensor information, data reception schedule, etc. Data can be searched by key words to find a path or location. The technical system is composed of four parts, which are respectively data comprehensive processing component, data management component, product distribution component and data display component. Virtual ground station users can access satellite image directly and timely. We expect that this kind of system is able to promote some new remote sensing applications fields, such as disaster monitoring, monitoring of progress for a big construction project, monitoring of natural heritage site, or monitoring of current events from the news.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Zhengshi Yu received his Ph.D. degree in the year 2015 at Beijing Institute of Technology. In Sep. 2014 to Sep. 2015, he visited University at Buffalo as research scholar and worked on the guidance, navigation, and control technologies for deep space exploration. Now he is the Post Doctor in Beijing Institute of Technology. Dr. Zhengshi Yu has his expertise in optimal estimation, trajectory optimization, autonomous guidance, navigation and control system, and image processing. Now he is working on the innovative navigation, guidance and control method for Mars EDL phase and small body exploration. He is the Project Leader of National Natural Science Foundation of China and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation Project.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: An accurate knowledge of Mars entry condition is the significant for a successful aerocapture and pinpoint landing. However, the traditional navigation scheme during the final approaching phase based on the Deep Space Network cannot achieve an accurate result because of the severe time delay. Navigation based on the X-ray pulsars has been proposed to improve the navigation performance. But highly nonlinear dynamic model and relatively low updating rate of measurement may result in filter divergence. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel online Batch-based Fusion Filter (BFF) dealing with the difficulties in Mars final approaching phase. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: In the algorithm, a batch-based estimation method with fixed batch length is developed to optimally determine the state of spacecraft. Unlike the traditional Moving Horizon Estimation, only the cost function of previous measurements is used so that the differential correction method can be used. The computation cost is also reduced. To incorporate the a priori information of state, a data fusion process is also employed. The stability and accuracy of batch-based estimation method is discussed, and the factors affecting the position and velocity estimation accuracy are also investigated. Findings: The configuration of X-ray pulsars is a main contribution to the estimation error. The navigation pulsars should be carefully chosen to guarantee an accurate estimation. If three pulsars are used, the direction of three pulsars should be orthogonal, which is identical to the analysis result using Fisher information matrix. Conclusion & Significance: The proposed online Batch-based Fusion Filter gives a potential solution to the navigation for Mars final approaching phase. If the configuration of pulsars are carefully chosen, the navigation performance can also be further improved. The accuracy analysis method can also be extended to other navigation schemes based on relative position measurements.

Speaker
Biography:

Shahinaz Yousef have been graduated from Cairo University Faculty of Science, Cairo University in 1966. Shahinaz Yousef got her M.Sc in nuclear physics from London university in 1967. She got her Ph. D in solar activity and XUV from university college London in Jan 1971. She is Prof. Emurites at Astronomy & Space & Meteorology Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Egypt. In 2016, she has been chosen by Cambrige biographycal centre  as one of the best 2000 intellectuals in the 21 centurey.  I have just published a book in Germany in 2016 on solar forcing on Equatorial African Lakes with Hashim ElFaki.

Abstract:

We have found one to one correspondence of sunspot number SSN oscillation in north Atlantic oscillation NAO. This extremely important result can be explained by our early result that the density of solar wind is related to solar activity. We found co-evidence for oscillations in Earth’s magnetopause altitude in response to variation of solar wind velocity & pressure. The variability of magnetosphere compression causes variability in atmospheric pressure with special emphasis on Polar Regions, in other word oscillation in NAO.

Speaker
Biography:

Yavor Shopov has completed his PhD from Sofia University, Bulgaria and postdoctoral studies from McMaster University, Canada. He is head of the University Centre for Space Research & Technologies, Sofia University. He is supervisor of Master programme on Aerospace engineering of small satellites of Sofia University. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. Fields of research: applications of satellites in applied and fundamental research, space physics and solar- terrestrial physics, design and development of optical and spectral equipment for photographic observations and photometry in different regions of the spectrum.

Abstract:

Mars has much weaker magnetic field and lower density of atmosphere regarding the Earth. These results in very high cosmic radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars. Radiation measurements on the surface of Mars demonstrated that dose rate which will receive an astronaut there is around 15 times higher than Dose Limits for Radiation Workers and 750 times higher than Dose Limits for general public. Therefore manned exploration of Mars requires using of immediate shelters of astronauts during the initial stages of the planet exploration. Only natural shelters, which can be found there are caves. Daily variations of the surface temperature on Mars reach 110- 120 degrees of Celcium. Temperature inside caves does not vary during day-and-night. It is constant (in the frames of one degree) even during the year. So location of caves on Mars can be of vital importance for future manned exploration of the planet, because such caves are appropriate for storage chambers and shelters of astronauts. We develop a new technique for remote location of cave entrances using thermal vision technique. It aims to locate new unknown caves using thermal vision camera, which visualize temperature difference on the air coming from the cave and that of the surrounding areas. During Martian nights temperature on the surface of the planet is tens of degrees of Celcium colder than that in the caves below. Therefore cave entrances can be easily located by a thermal vision camera located on space probes or ROVs. We successfully performed preliminary remote locations of cave entrances on Earth to optimize this technique for work on Mars. So far there are no any cave known on Mars, but there are sure indirect indicators of their existence.

Speaker
Biography:

Orlando Alvarez Pontoriero, Doctor in Geophysics. Current position as Assistant Researcher at CONICET and Professor at Instituto Geofísico y Sismologico Ing. F.S. Volponi, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Fisicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de San Juan. His current research is the study of great megathrust earthquakes rupture zones and its relation to Satellite Gravity. Other Research interests: Geophysics, Geodynamics, Subduction zones, Earthquakes forecasting and prediction.

Abstract:

Satellite gravimetry is a useful tool to identify mass anomalies along a subduction interface, interpreted as heterogeneities related to the rupture process during megathrust earthquakes. Different works with data derived from satellite gravity missions as GRACE and GOCE, have analyzed the static component of the Earth gravity field and its temporal variations. During the last decade the Chilean margin has been affected by three megathrust earthquakes with Mw>8. Then, the recently completed GOCE mission offered a unique opportunity to study this events by means of gravity gradients, which allowed mapping density heterogeneities with greater detail than the gravity anomaly which has been used in most studies up to now.

We derived the vertical gravity gradient from GOCE, corrected by the topographic effect and by the sediments on depocenters of the offshore region at the Peru-Chile margin, in order to study a spatial relationship between different lobes of the gravity derived signal and the seismic sources of large megathrust earthquakes. Then we find a good correlation between vertical gravity gradients and main rupture zones, correlation that becomes even stronger as the event magnitude increases. A gravity fall in the gravity gradient and in geoid heights was noticed over the area of the main slip patch at least for the two years before 2014 Mw=8.2 Pisagua earthquake. Additionally, we found temporal variations of the gravity field after 2010 Mw=8.8 Maule event, related to coseismic deformation. Therefore, we analyzed variations in the gravity field as an indirect measure of the variable seismic coupling. These relationships exemplify the strong potential of the satellite only derived models as a predictive tool to determine potential seismic energy released in a subduction segment, determining the potential size of a potential rupture zone, and in particular internal slip distribution that allows inferring coseismic displacement field at surface.

Oleg Troshichev

Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute
Russia

Title: Space weather monitoring and now casting by ground-based means
Speaker
Biography:

Oleg Troshichev graduated from Leningrad University, USSR. He has completed his PhD in physics in 1969 at the Siberian Institute of Earth Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radiowave Propagation (Irkutsk,). He takes charge of Department of Geophysics in AARI (St.Petersburg) from 1985. The main subject of his investigations is physics of the Earth’s magnetosphere and solar-terrestrial relations. Prof. Oleg Troshichev is author of the polar cap magnetic activity (PC) index that has been endorsed by the IAGA (2013) as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere. He has published more than 250 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The polar cap (PC) magnetic activity index was approved by International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) in 2013 as a new international index assigned to monitor the energy that enters into the magnetosphere during solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The following experimental data form the basis for this statement: (1) the PC index strongly follows the time evolution of interplanetary electric field (EKL) reduced to magnetopause, (2) delay time ΔT in response of PC index to EKL variations is controlled by the EKL field growth rate (dEKL/dt), (3) magnetic storms and substorms are always preceded and accompanied by РС index growth, (4) substorms and magnetic storms start to develop as soon as the PC index exceeds the threshold level of 1.5 mV/m, (5) the substorm sudden onsets are commonly associated with a sharp increase in the PC (and EKL) growth rate, (6) the solar drivers (ICMEs or SIRs determine the type of magnetic storm, such as “classic” storm, related to ICME impact, with well-defined PC maximum and clearly expressed one maximum of depression, “pulsed” storm, related to SIR impact, with periodically repeating oscillations in PC and geomagnetic field depression, and “combined storms”, which are regarded as effect of simultaneous ICME and SIR action, (7) maximal depression of magnetic field responds to maximal PC value with a delay of ~1 hour, the storm intensity (Dstmin) being linearly depending on PCmax value. In ~10% of the substorm events the correlation between EKL and PC is practically absent, in spite of actual substorm onset related to the PC index rise; in these cases the actual solar wind, measured in the Lagrange point, passes by the magnetosphere. It implies that РС index can be used also to verify whether or not the solar wind measured in Lagrange point L1 is in contact with the magnetosphere.

Speaker
Biography:

Ivan S. Tkachenko is an assistant professor, PhD of space engineering department of Samara University. In 2006 he organized the youth scientific-innovation center which is the main project was the project of creation small satellite “AIST”. In 2013 he became a project manager of “AIST-2D” satellite in the Samara University.

Abstract:

Launched on orbit in 2013 satellite constellation, consisting of two small spacecraft "AIST" is the result of joint work of students, postgraduates and young scientists of the Samara University and young professionals of Space Rocket Center "Progress" (Samara, Russia). Nowadays the satellites control, receiving and processing telemetry and scientific information are provided by young specialists of the university center for receiving and processing information. During three years of orbital working the unique information about the magnetic field of the Earth and micrometeorite situation on two different orbits in which satellites operate were received. In addition, experience in the design, creation and operation of these satellites allows to significantly upgrade the educational process in Samara University.

28 April 2016 during the first launch from Vostochny Cosmodrome the new satellite of “AIST” constellation – “Aist-2D” was launched. The primary goal of “Aist-2D” is remote sensing with high resolution - from an orbital altitude of 490 km it provides resolution of 1.48 m in panchromatic mode and 4.5 m in multispectral mode in a 39.6 km-width band.

The IR-range thermal equipment of “Aist-2D” which was the first to use microbolometric photo detectors without cooling, will not only produce night photographs, but also develop the technology for small fire foci detection.

The special-purpose equipment includes an innovative radar set developed for passive Earth location in a new R-range of frequencies (432-438 MHz). The scientists plan to use it for possible space observation not only of visible surfaces, but also subsurfaces.

The satellite holds six sets of scientific equipment created by scientists, students and post-graduate students of the Samara University.

The article gives the first results of “AIST-2D” functioning and an analysis of space images and data from scientific equipment received from the satellite. Some variants of constellation evolvement are discussed also in the report.

Mukesh S. Boori

Samara National Research University
Russia

Title: Food security and flood risk dynamics in Myanmar
Speaker
Biography:

Mukesh Singh Boori is Senior Scientist in Samara University Russia (03/2015–Present, funded by Russian Federation), Visiting Professor in JKLU University India (10/2016-11/2016), Visiting Senior Scientist at University of Bonn, Germany (05/2016–07/2016), Visiting Scientist/Professor at Hokkaido University Japan (12/2015–02/2016) and Adjunct Professor in American Sentinel University Colorado USA (07/2015–Present).  He was involved in European Union Project as well as Visiting Assistant Professor in Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic (04/2013–06/2015), Ruhr University Bochum Germany (09/2014–12/2014) and University of Leicester, UK (Honorary Fellow 2014) funded by European Union; at the same time he was Assistant Professor in JECRC University India (01/2013–06/2015). He was Scientist in Satellite Climate Studies Branch (NOAA/NASA) selected by National Research Council (NRC) Central Govt. of USA Washington DC. During that time he completed his Postdoc from University of Maryland USA (10/2012). He has done PhD (EIA & Management of Natural Resources) from Federal University – RN (UFRN) Natal –RN Brazil (08/2011) funded by Brazil–Italy Govt. fellowship. He has done Predoc (Earth & Environmental Science) from Katholieke University Leuven Belgium (08/2008) selected by Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD) New Delhi India and funded by Govt. of Belgium. He has done MSc (Remote sensing & GIS) from MDS University Ajmer (2004) and BSc (Bio-group) from University of Rajasthan Jaipur India (2002). In early career he was scientist in JSAC/ISRO (2006-2007) and before that Lecturer (PG) at MDS University Ajmer (2005-2007Sessions). He received international awards/fellowships from UK, USA, Brazil, Italy, Indonesia, Belgium, Czech Republic, Germany, Russia, China, Japan and India. He known Six Language and visit four Continents for Awards, Meetings, Trainings, Field Trips, Seminars and Conferences. He is an active Organizing Committee Member in Earth & Space Science Conferences, Co-Chaired a session and gave Conference Opening Ceremony Speech as Reynold Speaker (08/2012) Chicago USA and (05/2017) Barcelona Spain.  He is editor and member of more than 10 International Scientific Societies/Journals/Committees related to Earth & Space Science; which include organize conferences. His prime research interest is “EIA and Management of Natural Resources through Remote Sensing & GIS Technology”. He has more than 100 Peer-reviewed International Publications including Books as a first author on Vulnerability, Risk Assessment and Climate Change.

Abstract:

The Central Dry Zone area of Myanmar is the most water stressed and one of the most food insecure region in the country. In the Dry Zone area, the total population of 10.1 million people in 54 townships, in which approximately 43% live in below poverty line and 40-50% of the rural population is landless. Agriculture is the most important economic sector in Myanmar as it is essential for national food security and a major source of livelihood for its people. In this region the adverse effects of climate change such as late or early onset of monsoon season, longer dry spells, erratic rainfall, increasing temperature, heavy rains, stronger typhoons, extreme spatial-temporal variability of rainfall, high intensities, limited rainfall events in the growing season, heat stress, drought, flooding, sea water intrusion, land degradation, desertification, deforestation and other natural disasters are believed to be a major constraint to food insecurity and flood risk. Theses extreme climatic events are likely increase in frequency and magnitude of serious drought periods and extreme floods. Food insecurity is an important thing that must be reviewed because it relates to the lives of many people. Food security is composed of subsystems, availability, distribution, and consumption so that if one of subsystem is not well functioning, there will be a problem of food insecurity. This paper gives a structured overview of the current scientific knowledge available and reveals the relevance of this information with regard to food security and flood risk dynamics in central dry zone area of Myanmar.

Speaker
Biography:

Gennady Semenovich Luk’yanchikov  Born on 30 April 1937 in Moscow, Russia. He is currently Senior Researcher, Department of Plasma Physics, Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Gennady Luk’yanchikov graduated from Department of Electronics, Moscow Power Engineering Institute (National Research University) (1962), received Ph.D. of physics-mathematics in 1977. He has more than 50 publications. His research interests include plasma physics, interaction of microwave power with solids.

Abstract:

It is proposed a new type of FV called ERELYOT. A special electrode system – the ERE system is built into ERELYOT. The ERE system initiates the electrical discharge of a special type –the ERE discharge. When the ERE discharge is in outer space, there is a possibility of a mode in which all the emitted particles do not arrive at the electrodes of opposite polarity, but go away into space, thereby creating a reactive force. The power system of ERELYOT consists of the battery of fuel cells and devices, which convert the energy of electromagnetic radiation into the DC power.

The purpose of this work is: to develop the design of the ERELYOT; to determine the  required parameters of the power system of ERELYOT.

The result: A possible design of ERELYOT is presented. It is shown that the use of microwave and solar radiation is possible and extremely advantageous.

Conclusion.  The main task is the creation of high voltage (tens of kilovolts) battery, operating on oxygen and hydrogen with a minimal ratio of the weight of the battery to its power and low (~0°C) the temperature of the water coming out of the battery.

An equally important task is to create the emitter of microdroplets of water with the maximum possible value of q/m (q, m – electric charge and mass of the droplets), and the maximum possible number of droplets emitted from a unit of surface per a unit of time. The greater is the value of q/m, the less the value of U is allowed to be.

Speaker
Biography:

Paul TEMATIO is an Associate Professor with a PhD in Earth Science. He is a Senior Researcher and Lecturer in the University of Dschang, Cameroon. He is experienced in Soil and Water resources management, Mineralogy and geochemistry of weathering products as well as Remote sensing applied on mineral resources exploration. He published two major papers in the use of GIS and ETM+ Imageries to map Bauxite ore deposits in humid tropical environment of Cameroon (Tematio et al., 2015; Momo Nouazi et al., 2016). This approach might be promising for larger scale investigations of other mineral resources in tropical regions.

Abstract:

The present study aims at mapping some western Cameroon bauxites combining results of digital processing of satellite data (ETM+ of LandSat) with the geological, structural, mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of the Foumban area. Two categories of encrusted bauxitic surfaces have been identified: (i) discontinuous surfaces covering a total area of 11.13 km2, and (ii) continuous surfaces overlapping 2.41 km2. Field observations portray discontinuous surfaces with 5.5 m thick bauxitic mantle subdivided into 1.5 m thick discontinuous duricrust lying on 4.0 m thick continuous duricrust. The continuous surfaces are 4.1 m thick bauxitic duricrust. Mineralogical studies showed that the Foumban bauxites exhibit 78–86% of gibbsite, 7–22% of goethite and less than 7% of kaolinite. Geochemically, Al is the most abundant element with 45.6–58.7 wt.% of Al2O3; followed by Fe with 12.9–20.1 wt.% of Fe2O3 and Si with 1.0–3.7 wt.% of SiO2. Element mobility stated with enrichment factor (EF) allows differentiating three chemical elements: strongly depleted with EF < 1 (Si, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cu, Mn, Zn); strictly enriched with EF > 1 (Al, Fe, Cr); and with irregular depletion and enrichment behavior with EF } 1 (Nb, Sr, V, Zr). Based on mass-transport function (M), elements decrease as follows: Sr > Nb > Cr > Al > Zr > V > Zn > Fe > Cu > Si > Ca > K = Na > Mg > Mn. The Foumban encrusted bauxites are classified as laterite and iron-rich high grade orth-bauxites with 45.6–58.7 wt.% of Al2O3 and 1.0–3.7 wt.% of SiO2, with bauxite reserves estimated to 75.8 million tons. The mapping approach has shown to be suitable for delineating encrusted bauxitic surfaces within loose laterites in tropical regions.

Speaker
Biography:

Benhard Sitohang finished his master (informatics) in 1980 and Ph.D degree (informatics) in 1983, both from Universite de Sciences et Techniques et Languedoc-Montpellier II, France. From 1984, he has been working at Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB) as Lecturer and Researcher. Actually he is chair of “Knowledge & Software Engineering Research Division”.

Abstract:

Indonesian marine fisheries potential of approximately 65 million tons per year and become the largest in the world, but only about 15 percent exploited (10.5 tons per year). The fish taken from waters that have exceeded the maximum sustainable yield. This is a challenge for us to find new fishing grounds. Remote sensing satellite data utilization is the solution to predict the fishing grounds in Indonesian waters. Fishing grounds can be predicted by observing the phenomenon of upwelling in the ocean waters. Upwelling phenomenon can be detected by analyzing sea surface temperature (SST) data acquired by satellites such as NOAA and Terra/Aqua. Several algorithms have been developed to process satellite data resulting SST similar to actual SST. We develop a model of upwelling detection using SST data from satellites Terra / Aqua MODIS Level 3. We exploit the concept spatiogram to determine upwelling region of interest (RoI) in the study area, then use the structure growing to ensure that the RoI is a valid upwelling. We define indicators upwelling areas where there is a temperature difference of 0.5oC within a radius of 3 km, then all pixels in a radius of 3 km (12 pixels) from the center of mass must be taken into account. We assume the RoI is determined as far as 21 km which is equivalent to 84 pixels. We are still working on intensive research; the results are highly dependent on the quality of the satellite data used, in particular the case of cloud cover.

Speaker
Biography:

Vinod Kumar is Deputy Division Head and Deputy Project Director, AOCS at Control, Dynamics and Simulation Group, ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bengaluru. He joined ISAC in 1997 where he has been involved with the design and development of Attitude and Orbit Control Systems (AOCS) of over three dozen satellites in the last nearly 20 years. Dr. Vinod has developed crucial technologies for satellites. He has developed a critical mirror motion compensation technique for ISRO’s meteorological satellite series, which achieved the ultimate pointing accuracy and stringent jitter stability of 1 micro-degree/s. This pivotal technique enables the Indian Met. Department to do accurate weather forecasting by observing oceans and clouds precisely with geostationary satellites; snow-cover mapping and snow-depth estimation for the Defence. He has developed a fault detection, isolation and reconfiguration techniques for GEO satellites which has become the backbone of ISRO’s fleet of spacecraft including Mars Orbiter Mission. This onboard autonomy continuously protects the satellites from losing the earth-lock, monitors the health of the satellites, and reports to the MCF/ISTRAC ground station. Also, because of this autonomy, the GEOSAT communication satellites provide uninterrupted mobile and Direct-to-Home communication services, ensuring continuity of revenues for the ISRO. In his doctoral research, he developed autonomous navigation (autonav) techniques for collocated geostationary satellites at a desired longitude using Indian Regional Navigation Satellites System (IRNSS). ISRO is contemplating to mechanize his absolute and relative autonav techniques by placing crosslink antennas on the collocated satellites for inter-satellite communication, and facilitate real-time sharing of IRNSS observables. His autonav technique for the collocated geostationary satellites is of tremendous value because it relieves the MCF/ISTRAC ground engineers from ground-based tracking and orbit determination of the satellites. Dr. Vinod has over eighteen publications in national and international conferences and reputed journals. His additional technical interests include terrain navigation, pulsar navigation, and interplanetary missions. Before joining the ISAC, he worked on aircraft control systems. Still earlier he held a faculty position at Regional Engineering College, Kurukshetra; Haryana.

Abstract:

In view of possibility of diverse applications from space the requirement for satellites is increasing. These applications include internet access, entertainment, broadcast, navigation, cellular phone, remote sensing missions, scientific missions and so forth, hence the requirement for more satellites. Each nation and space agency wants to harness its benefits and hence demand to launch more and more satellites arises. This calls for autonomous attitude and orbit control system for satellites from launch onwards, not only for individual satellites but also for the satellites in formation. This talk is focused on the autonomous spacecraft operations after injection till the end of life of a satellite. The autonomous attitude control system is achieved by the on-board sensors. The autonomous orbit control system needs development of an on-board navigation system. It requires precise knowledge of the absolute state (position, velocity, and time i.e. PVT) of the spacecraft as well as relative state of the neighboring spacecraft. The relative navigation requires inter satellite communication at ultra-high frequency. There exists a gap in the observability of the states of a satellite. This gap can be bridged by using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) or by novel infra-red earth sensor and star sensor based autonomous navigation techniques. GNSS is used for kinematic PVT estimation. The kinematic formulation is geometric, and it is vulnerable to weak GNSS geometry, data outages, cycle slip, and large dilution of precision. In this situation, dynamics can provide the solutions with little degradation in accuracy. This requires combining the GNSS measurements with dynamics in an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF), thus providing continuity in the PVT estimates. Another challenge is contingency management in case of GNSS outages or malfunction. This requires alternate relative navigation and control using, for instance, laser range finder and optical navigation. We also discuss an optical navigation and control technique for formation flying satellites using monocular model-based vision. These methods will be useful even during the geostationary transfer orbit phase, autonomous station-keeping, rendezvous and docking, for interplanetary missions during their transfer orbit phase for some period, and to the low-Earth-orbit remote sensing satellites.

Speaker
Biography:

Ishita Ganjoo, completed her Bachelor of Technology in Avionics from Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology in 2014. She is currently working as a scientist/engineer in the Control Dynamics and Simulation Group at the ISRO Satellite Centre of Indian Space Research Organization, Bangalore, India-560017. Her field of work is Advanced Navigation and Control of satellite systems. Her other interests include Computer Networks and Hybrid Wireless Networks.

Abstract:

In this paper, the objective is to use the navigation signals (pseudorange and carrier phase measurements) from GPS satellites to kinematically estimate the precise absolute position of a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite and their receiver clock biases. GPS observables can estimate the precise position of a satellite in near real time. The GPS satellite navigation and observables file is downloaded for the starting epoch of 01-01-2016 00:00 UT. The observables are then generated for a LEO satellite at an altitude of 901.4 km. The absolute position is estimated using pseudorange measurements. The worst case accuracies obtained are [5.68 8.04 6.17] m in ECEF frame which are observed when the dilution of precision (DOP) value is high due to poor geometry of the visible GPS constellation with respect to the LEO satellite. This estimated absolute position is smoothened with the time-differenced carrier phase measurements. The Kalman filter gains are computed in near real time. The worst case smoothened accuracies obtained are [2.24 2.60 2.6982] m in ECEF frame. This has shown improved estimated absolute position.

Speaker
Biography:

SIMI K G received her Ph.D degree in space physics in the year 2013. Her research is in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization and it focuses on Solar-Terrestrial Physics with particular emphasis on Space weather and its impacts on electrodynamics of upper atmosphere. She is mainly involved in the data analysis of various ground and space based radio probing instruments and the research output is useful for modeling the equatorial ionosphere during space weather events. She has been awarded with prestigious INSPIRE Faculty Award by Govt.of India which is given to young scientific achievers by Department of Science and Technology and Indian National Science Academy. She is also a resource person of Department of Science and Technology, Govt of India. Currently she is working as an Assistant Professor in Physics.

Abstract:

 A case of the drastic effects of an eastward prompt penetration and a westward overshielding electric field successively affecting the daytime equatorial ionosphere during the space weather event that occurred on 24 November 2001 is presented. Under the influence of the strong eastward prompt penetration electric field starting from 11:25 Indian standard time (IST), the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) strength reached the maximum value of 225 nT at 12:42 IST, almost 7 times greater than the monthly quiet time mean at the same time. This peak EEJ value exceeds the maximum observed values during the month of November for the entire solar cycle by more than 100 nT, irrespective of quiet or disturbed conditions. Further, owing to an ensuing overshielding event that occurred during the main phase of the storm rather than the end of the main phase, this unusually large EEJ showed an equally strong polarity reversal along with a weakening of the sporadic E layer over the equator. The EEJ strength was reduced from +225 to - 120 nT at ~ 13:45 IST, resulting in a strong counter electrojet condition. The latitudinal variation of the F region electron density data from the CHAMP satellite reveal an ill-developed equatorial ionization anomaly at 17:00 IST (11:24 UT) over the Indian sector due to this significant weakening of the zonal electric field. Unlike other geomagnetic storm events, the event reported here occurs in the main phase of the storm, and the main phase continues even after the overshielding event. Hence, this overshielding event does not trigger the recovery of the storm, although there is a reduction in the convection due to the northward turning of the IMF Bz. Interestingly, the overshielding does trigger the recovery of the substorm.

Speaker
Biography:

Akansha Singh has expertise in the area of remote sensing, image processing and neural networks.  She has to her credit several research papers in SCI indexed journals of high repute, international peer reviewed journals, and international conferences. She has also authored a number of technical books for undergraduate engineering students. Dr.Akansha has served as reviewer of various journals and conferences. Dr. Singh has chaired a number of technical session in various international conferences. She is working on sponsored projects for developing assistive tools for autistic children.

Abstract:

Classifying remote sensing images is a tedious and complex task as it involves a number of factors to be considered. Designing an efficient classification method is influenced by the user’s needs, the spatial resolution of the remotely sensed data, compatibility with previous work, available image-processing and classification algorithms, and time constraints. Also the classification system should be informative, exhaustive, and separable. Remote sensing image classification is applied to various areas like urban planning, disaster management, vegetation monitoring, and forest cover monitoring. One of the most significant areas is monitoring of natural disasters. Natural disasters are serious events which end up from earth’s natural processes. The occurrence of natural disasters in the recent years has increased greatly. The major disasters include tsunamis, floods, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes etc. Floods are one of the most frequent and devastating natural hazards that occur worldwide. Flood occurs due to excessive rainfall in a short duration of time and consequent high river discharge causes large amount of damage. an image classification method based on GA trained RBFNN for remotely sensed images are proposed. The proposed method uses RBFNN to find the optimal centres for different land cover classes. Radial basis function network provides a way to handle the large amount of data present in remote sensing images. The efficiency of RBFNN is greatly influenced by the initial seed selection and training used. Thus to enhance the efficiency of RBFNN spectral indices and training based on GA is used in this work. GA has proved to be one of the most powerful optimization tools in a large space and hence work effectively in finding cluster centres for image classification. The training of RBFNN with GA gives a powerful and efficient method for remote sensing image classification. Landsat 8 OLI images of South China area are classified using the proposed method. The method is applied to detect the flooded area near Dongting lake in South China.

Speaker
Biography:

Shankar Bhattarai completed his MSc. Physics in Patan Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal in the year 2017 and BSc. Physics in Patan Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University in the year 2011.

Abstract:

The Langmuir Probe is the key plasma diagnostic used by scientists interested in plasma characterization to measure the internal parameters of the bulk of the plasma. Spherical Langmuir Probes have been installed on satellites and sounding rockets to observe the general characteristics of thermal plasma in the ionosphere for more than five decades. Because of its simplicity and convenience, the Langmuir probe is one of the most frequently installed scientific instruments on spacecraft.

This research explores the theoretical study of Spherical Langmuir Probe I-V Characteristics. With the help of the (volt–ampere curves) of spherical Langmuir probes, the different parameters of plasma can be determined such as plasma potential, floating potential, probe currents in different probe voltage and so on. The effect of electron temperature on the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) was also analyzed. At higher energy range, the shape of the distribution recovers and the tail trend with energy is maintained and decreases exponentially.

Speaker
Biography:

Head specialist of the Laboratory for Electromagnetic Innovations (LEMI). Also Scientific Director at Lviv Center of Institute for Space Research of the National Academy of Sciences and State Space Agency of Ukraine. Education: Graduated from Lviv Polytechnical Institute as electric engineer in 1965. Ph.D. Degree in Electromagnetic Measurements in Lviv Polytechnical Institute in 1970. Habilitation of Ph.D. in Geophysics in Institute of Physics of the Earth (Moscow) in 1991. main field of activity: development of theoretical and methodological aspects of electric and magnetic fields investigations in different media: space plasma, marine water and on-land; design and manufacturing of different types of magnetometers, electrometers and means of their calibration. Other fields: research on monitoring methodology of electromagnetic precursors of natural hazards.

Abstract:

Small satellites are the main challenge nowadays to execute scientific and applied space experiments. Because of very dense package of electronic equipment in such satellites, the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) problem became still more important than formerly. Especially it concerns cubesat-format scientific experiments aimed at electromagnetic processes study. Usually nanosatellites produce less electromagnetic interference (EMI) than big satellites; however, the compact design leads to a considerable increase of mutual influence between payload systems. So, special attention to EMC problem still at development stage is an essential task. The goal of the present report is to analyze the EMC problem for small satellites and to give advice how to determine existing radiation sources location inside the satellite body and their intensity. First, the EMC requirements specifications formulation for spacecraft mission and possible means to follow these requirements are discussed in the report. Next stage is to execute the measurements of electromagnetic interference sources intensity of separate units and their localization in the assembled satellite. The aim of employing EMI measures is to study whether a variety of different items of electronic equipment can operate in close proximity without causing any undue interference. These measurements are especially difficult in ELF-VLF frequency range because of specific peculiarities of field structure and high level of industrial noise. Several methods had been proposed for the localization of the stray magnetic field sources. Their analysis is made and it was concluded that the most convenient one is to use the magnetic field measurements by two sets of fixed and spaced 3-component magnetometers when the satellite is also fixed. Possible configuration of a customized EMI meter realizing this method for pre-flight analysis of nanosatellite interference is discussed.  The results of its application for SEAM cubesat which is designed for electromagnetic research in the ionosphere  are presented.

Speaker
Biography:

Yaroslav Yatskiv has his expertise in the field of geodynamics and evaluation of Earth rotation peculiarities. His evaluations of Earth Pole movement are well known as open set of pole coordinates. Ya. Yatskiv initiated the development and application of new observation methods to determine the parameters of Earth rotation: laser satellite location, VLBI radio interferometry, GPS-observations. He proposed new approaches for the global planetary and celestial coordinate systems. He actively participated in preparing and fulfillment of several space missions according to the programs Vega, FOBOS, MARS, and is serving as coordinator of Space Research Program of Ukraine Academy of Sciences.  In 2012 he initiated the development of the satellite project "Aerosol-UA" for microphysics of atmospheric aerosol properties study from the orbit.

Abstract:

The development of Ukrainian space project "Aerosol-UA" for study of the terrestrial atmospheric aerosol spatial distribution and microphysics to quantify the aerosol contribution to the climate change is discussed. The aerosol remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere, aerosol and the surface by the scanning polarimeter ScanPol accompanied by the wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter MSIP. The ScanPol designed for remote sensing of aerosol properties to measure Stokes parameters I, Q, U within the spectral range from the UV to the SWIR in a wide range of phase angles (Milinevsky et al. 2016). Expected ScanPol polarimetric accuracy is ~0.15%. The spectral channels of the ScanPol are used to estimate the tropospheric aerosol absorption, the aerosol over the ocean and the land surface, the signals from cirrus clouds, stratospheric aerosols caused by major volcanic eruptions, and the contribution of the Earth's surface. The imager–polarimeter MSIP will collect images on the state of the atmosphere and surface in the area, where the ScanPol polarimeter will measure, to retrieve aerosol optical depth and polarization properties of aerosol by registration of three Stokes parameters simultaneously in three spectral channels. The main feature of the MSIP channels is the splitting of the image by a special prism-splitter for four images on the same image detector in each channel. In that way we can simultaneously measure four polarization components at 0°, 45°, 90°and 135° as images in each of three polarization channels. One of the special features of ScanPol/MSIP concept is calibration of the MSIP using ScanPol data in the same field-of-view with ~1% expected polarization accuracy. The instruments of "Aerosol-UA" experiment is planned to be launched at the new satellite platform YuzhSat developed in DO Yuzhnoye (Figure 1).

Speaker
Biography:

Aziza Bounhir is a professor at University Cady Ayyad at the Applied Physics department of the Faculty of Science and Technique at Marrakech (Morocco). She obtained her Ph.D from Paris Denis-Diderot University (Paris, France) in microelectronics. Her field of expertise was the silicun-micromachining made microactuators and micromotors. She also obtained a second Ph.D in astronomy and astrophysics at Cady Ayyad university in 2009. She obtained an expertise on aerosols, astronomical site testing, astro-climatic parameters and dedicated satellite measurements. Since 2013 her research interest is space meteorology. She participate in the establishment of the new field of space weather at the university Cady Ayyad through the teaching of the master and Ph.D students and the exploitation of the data of the equipments dedicated to space weather at the Oukaimeden observatory. She is the national coordinator in Morocco of the ISWI (International Space Weather Initiative).

Abstract:

A major concern for the community of astronomers is to find the best places on earth suitable for astronomical observations, where the sky is the clearest with least turbulent atmosphere. Satellite measurements and meteorological databases, by scanning the whole earth, are a unique tool to aid in decision making concerning the pre-selection of astronomical sites. Morocco was part in the extremely large telescope (ELT) project prospect as Oukaimeden (latitude=31°12’32’’N, longitude=7°52’52’’W, altitude=2700m) observatory was one of the candidates. Light pollution, astro-climatique parameters, aerosol load, exctinction coefficient are key parameters in the selection process.  In this contribution we focuse on site testing in terms of aerosol loadings that dramatically affects the observations and most importantly in the visible and infrared wavelengths. The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) possesses hundreds of radiometers covering almost  the entire globe and providing ground based measurements of the aerosol optical depth is a very precious tool. We try to adress two questions ; the first one concerne the reliability of the sky transpency satellite product, and the other one concernes the inference of the aerosol optical depth to higher altitudes typically where astronomical observatories are built. For that purpose, we used the most popular satellite products such as TOMS EP, TOMS OMI, MISR, MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua, seven AERONET stations, and The Carlsberg Meridian Telescope  nightly values of the total extinction coefficient at the obnservatory of Roque de Los Muchachos (ORM;  latitude=28º45’36’’N, longitude=17º52’57’’W, altitude=2326m).

Ryspek Usubamatov

Kyrgyz State Technical University
Kyrgyzstan

Title: Fundamental principles of gyroscope theory
Speaker
Biography:

Ryspek Usubamatov has graduated as professional engineer, completed Ph.D from Bauman Moscow State Technical University and Doctor of Technical Sciences from Academy of Sciences of Kyrgyzstan. He worked as an engineer-designer of machine tools at engineering company. He is a professor of Kyrgyz State Technical University and worked at universities in Malaysia. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals, more than 60 patents of inventions in engineering and seven books in area of manufacturing engineering. He supervised six Ph.D and several dozens of MSc. students. His research interests in area of Gyroscope theory and Productivity theory for Industrial Engineering.

Abstract:

Gyroscope devices are primary units for navigation and control systems in aviation, space, ships, and other industries. The main property of the gyroscope device is maintaining the axis of a spinning rotor for which mathematical models have been formulated on the law of kinetic energy conservation and the changes in the angular momentum. However, known mathematical models for the gyroscope effects do not match actual forces and motions underway. The nature of the gyroscope properties is more complex than is represented by contemporary theories. Recent investigations have demonstrated that gyroscopes have four inertial forces interdependently and simultaneously acting on them. These forces are internal kinetic energies generated by the mass-elements and centre-mass of the spinning rotor and represented by centrifugal, Coriolis, and common inertial forces as well as changes in angular momentum. The applied torque generates internal resistance torques that based on action of centrifugal and Coriolis forces; and the precession torques generated by common inertial forces and by the change in the angular momentum. Apart these, the friction forces acting on the gyroscope supports play considerable role in decreasing the internal kinetic energy of the spinning rotor. The new mathematical models for gyroscope effects describe clearly and exactly all known and new gyroscope properties. Mathematical models for the most unsolvable motions of the gyroscope with one side support are validated by practical tests. Formulated models for motions of the gyroscope represent fundamental principles of gyroscope theory based on the actions of internal centrifugal, Coriolis and inertial forces and the change in angular momentum, and external applied and friction forces. This new theoretical approach for the gyroscope problems represents new challenge in engineering science.