Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Satellite & Space Missions Barcelona, Spain.

Day 1 :

Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Benjamin K. Malphrus photo
Biography:

Benjamin K. Malphrus is Professor of Space Science at Morehead State University where he also directs the Space Science Center. He has served on the scientific staff of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, the University of South Carolina and West Virginia University. He served as Principle Investigator (PI) on nanosatellite missions including KySat-2, the Cosmic X-Ray Background Nanosatellite (CXBN), and CXBN-2, and has had various roles on other smallsat missions. He is currently PI on the Lunar IceCube Mission- a $15 M NASA project designed to investigate the transport physics of water ice on the Moon.  He has published papers on topics ranging from extragalactic astrophysics to instrumentation in radio astronomy, to nanosatellite systems development and was awarded over $18 million R&D grant funding. In the late 1990s, he developed a theory of galaxy formation that has gained wide acceptance among the astronomical community.

Abstract:

A new era of solar system exploration is being ushered in by NASA’s Exploration Mission-1 (EM-1).  EM-1 is the maiden voyage of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), which when it launches in 2018, will be the most powerful rocket ever built.  SLS will support human exploration beyond LEO and will also serve as a platform to launch small satellites as secondary payloads to Earth escape. NASA has selected 13 secondary payloads, to launch on EM-1, all 6U CubeSats that will travel to planetary destinations to perform science investigations that address NASA Strategic Knowledge Gaps. CubeSats are “nanosatellite” class research spacecraft that are built in standardized units. The standard unit (U), is 10 cm × 10 cm × 11 cm, and has a mass of 1.33 kilograms per U. Four lunar EM-1 CubeSats, Lunar Flashlight, Lunar IceCube, LunaH-Map and Skyfire will work together to investigate water ice and other volatiles on the lunar surface.  NEA-Scout will rendezvous with a near Earth asteroid to investigate its composition, geology, volatile resources and orbit dynamics.  Biosentinel will investigate the effect of the deep space environment on biological systems.  The manifest will include two JAXA CubeSats, EQUULEUS and OMOTENASHI, an ESA and Italian Space Agency CubeSat- ArgoMoon, and two CubeSats to be selected from NASA’s CubQuest challenge.  A variety of enabling technologies including electric propulsion, solar sail technologies, miniature science instruments, radiation tolerant processors, precise attitude control systems, compact ranging transponders and high data rate communication systems will be demonstrated by these missions.  Innovative low energy manifold trajectories will be employed to allow the spacecraft to travel to deep space destinations with limited propellant mass and constrained delta-v.  The 13 secondary payloads to be deployed on EM-1, including Lunar IceCube, will usher in a new era of solar system exploration with small satellite platforms.

Keynote Forum

Kent Miller

Air Force Office of Scientific Research
USA

Keynote: Space Research at AFOSR
Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kent Miller photo
Biography:

Kent L. Miller is an International Program Officer at the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).  He received his BS in Physics from Utah State University and his MS and PhD in Physics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.  His doctoral dissertation examined small-scale ionospheric structures using data from sounding rockets and incoherent scatter radar.  He was a research physicist at the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory and a Research Professor at Utah State University.  He was advisor to the “Get-Away-Special” program at Utah State and the University NanoSatellite Program at AFOSR.  He joined AFOSR in 1996 and has been the program office for space science and SSA in the Arlington office and at EOARD in London.  He is a Senior Executive Fellow of the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and a Fellow of the Air Force Research Laboratory.

Abstract:

International cooperation in space research and in space education is the source of opportunities that are of mutual benefit internationally.  We describe opportunities for the United States military to promote international cooperation in research and to cooperatively offer graduate space education to overseas partner nations.

 

The mission of the International Office of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) includes bridging and building mutually beneficial relationships between scientists overseas and scientists in the United States that will result in the acceleration of S&T achievement.  Program officers at AFOSR discover, shape, and champion basic science that profoundly impacts the future US Air Force.  In doing so, they also impact civilian science.  International program officers have the additional responsibility of acting as liaison officers for all programs of the Air Force Research Laboratory to the international science community.  Space technology research seeks new concepts for space instrumentation.  Research related to space situational awareness seeks better understanding of astrodynamics and of the observation and tracking of space objects.  Space weather research is focused on the understanding of the space environment with a goal to enable and extend operational forecasting.

 

The AFOSR and the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) have teamed to sponsor newly developed space education programs offered by faculty from the United States Naval Postgraduate School’s Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Science and AFIT’s School of Strategic Force Studies.  An initial “Introductory Space” course has been taught in Santiago, Chile; while both Columbia and Brazil have expressed interest to be the next participants.  The introductory course allows the students to ascertain their readiness to study at the graduate-level.  Success at the introductory course permits the students to proceed into a graduate certificate, followed by a master’s degree using distance learning technologies.

Keynote Forum

O. Romberg

German Aerospace Center DLR
Germany

Keynote: Post‐ISS Concept for 2025 and Beyond
Satellite 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker O. Romberg photo
Biography:

Oliver Romberg studied Mechanical Engineering with specialization in Mechanics, performed his phD at the Institute for Mechanics of the University of Hannover in 1998 and worked since then in the field of Space Technology. In the year 1998 he started in the company OHB System in Bremen, Germany as Systems Engineer, Project Manager and later as deputy department head. In parallel he gave lectures in Mechanics at the University of Applied Science in Bremen. Since 2007 Dr. Romberg works as head of the DLR department System Analysis Space Segment for the German Aerospace Center. As assistant professor he gives lectures in Systems and Concurrent Engineering at the University of Bremen.

Abstract:

The International Space Station (ISS) demonstrates successful international cooperation between many partners regarding engineering as well as programmatic aspects. There are more and more ideas in the development of new markets by shifting responsibilities to private entities and broadening research disciplines, demanding faster access by users and including new launcher and experiment facilitator companies. A review of worldwide activities shows that all spacefaring nations are developing their individual programs for the time after ISS . Europe is interested in LEO and human spaceflight as discussed by the ISECG, depending on funding commitments. ISS follow-on activities should comprise clear scientific and technological objectives combined with commercial application and the long term view on space exploration. This includes key competences like robotics, internal and external space structures, module/facility and experiment operations as well as supply systems. Based on Concurrent Engineering (CE) processes, DLR started to investigate future low cost options by evaluating various LEO infrastructure concepts including opportunities for national realization and international cooperation based on feasible budgets. Using the Concurrent Engineering Facility (CEF) of DLR Bremen, scientists and users from various disciplines are involved in assessing the feasibility of various Post-ISS options. Resulting payloads are based on Mir and ISS experience with respect to future scientific and technological research questions. Further, together with US and European industry, NASA and ESA astronauts, operation specialists, current ISS users and scientists, DLR conducted extensive CE studies for Post-ISS concepts. This work converged into a Phase A design called Orbital -Hub based on a small low cost manned LEO platform including Free Flyer. The first flying hardware components could be realised in the frame of moderate budgets in the next eight years. The Orbital-Hub would guarantee a smooth transition between ISS and further space activities beyond LEO and would represent an important step towards long term human space exploration.

  • Track 1: Space Missions | Track 03: Space exploration | Track 4: Earth Observation Satellites | Track 7: Satellite Navigation and Communication
Speaker
Biography:

Benjamin K. Malphrus is Professor of Space Science at Morehead State University where he also directs the Space Science Center. He has served on the scientific staff of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, the University of South Carolina and West Virginia University. He served as Principle Investigator (PI) on nanosatellite missions including KySat-2, the Cosmic X-Ray Background Nanosatellite (CXBN), and CXBN-2, and has had various roles on other smallsat missions. He is currently PI on the Lunar IceCube Mission- a $15 M NASA project designed to investigate the transport physics of water ice on the Moon.  He has published papers on topics ranging from extragalactic astrophysics to instrumentation in radio astronomy, to nanosatellite systems development and was awarded over $18 million R&D grant funding. In the late 1990s, he developed a theory of galaxy formation that has gained wide acceptance among the astronomical community.

Abstract:

Lunar IceCube, a 6U CubeSat designed to prospect for water in solid, liquid, and vapor forms and other volatiles from a low-perigee, highly inclined lunar orbit, has been selected by NASA to fly on Exploration Mission -1 (EM-1).  The mission is a partnership between Morehead State University, NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, JPL, the Busek Company, and Vermont Tech. Lunar IceCube will be deployed during lunar trajectory by the Space Launch System (SLS) and use an innovative RF Ion engine to achieve lunar capture and the science orbit (inertially locked, highly elliptical, 100 km periapsis) to investigate the distribution of water as a function of time of day, latitude, and regolith composition in the context of lunar mineralogy. IceCube will include the Broadband InfraRed Compact High Resolution Exploration Spectrometer (BIRCHES), developed by GSFC- a compact version of the successful New Horizons instrument designed with the high spectral resolution (5 nm) and wavelength range (1 to 4 μm) needed to distinguish forms of water, including ice. The mission will complement the scientific work of other missions by focusing on the abundance, location and transportation physics of water ice on the lunar surface at a variety of latitudes. Lunar IceCube, while primarily a science mission, will demonstrate technologies that will enable future interplanetary exploration with small satellite platforms including radiation-hardened subsystems, a precise ranging transponder/transceiver, a capable attitude determination and control system, a high power solar array and an innovative electric propulsion system (EP).  The EP (Busek BIT-3 Iodine engine) generates 1.2km-1 of delta-v and, combined with an innovative low energy manifold trajectory, allows the spacecraft to reach lunar orbit from Earth escape with minimal energy. The 13 secondary payloads to be deployed on EM-1, including Lunar IceCube, will usher in a new era of solar system exploration with small satellite platforms.

Speaker
Biography:

Darren McKnight is currently Technical Director for Integrity Applications, Inc. (IAI) based in Chantilly, Virginia.  He leads teams to develop creative solutions across widely disparate domains: space systems, renewable energy, predictive awareness for infectious disease outbreaks, bioterrorism, orbital debris, workforce productivity, and youth soccer training.  Dr. McKnight released his fifth book, Make Yourself Indispensable, in March 2015.

Abstract:

Orbital debris is a growing hazard to reliable space operations and the sustainability of space-based systems that increasingly support national security and economic stability for many countries. Short-term attention has been focused on collision avoidance for operational payloads and enhanced debris mitigation guideline compliance while long-term attention has been focused on studying debris remediation via Active Debris Removal (ADR).

These three activities must be continued and augmented by three new efforts that work together to provide improved debris remediation activities to enhance space flight safety. The three new efforts are (1) an international Spacecraft Anomalies and Failures Workshop; (2) Massive Collision Monitoring Activity (MCMA) operations; and (3) Just-in-time Collision Avoidance (JCA) development.

This paper provides a plan that is focused on maintaining progress in three existing initiatives and starting three new ones.

Gonzalo Munévar

Lawrence Technological University
USA

Title: The value of Space Exploration
Speaker
Biography:

Gonzalo Munévar has been keenly interested in many aspects of science, as can be seen in the numerous books and papers he has published since receiving his Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley.  He has a particular interest in the nature of scientific exploration as found in the pursuit of space missions.  In his latest manuscript, The Dimming of Starlight, now in its final editing, he takes a close look at the value of space exploration, analyzing in detail the significance of space missions for all of natural science and for the wellbeing of humankind.  He also discusses the most promising directions for space research, the tension between machines and humans in exploration, and then uses his background in evolutionary biology and experimental neuroscience to examine the possibility of alien life and intelligence.  He closes the book by showing the connection between space exploration and human survival.

Abstract:

The main value of the exploration of space is that it transforms our views of the Earth and the universe to the significant benefit of our species.  As we explore space we challenge our science, and as we challenge our science we change it in ways so profound that we come to face a different panorama of problems and opportunities in our dealings with the world.   Indeed, it is as if a new world opens up to us; and when we try to adapt to the new “lay of the land,” ideas and inventions occur to us that would have been unimaginable under the old perspective.  It has often been argued that scientific exploration leads to serendipitous discoveries, but such arguments are supported mainly by historical anecdotes. In my view, however, serendipity is a natural, practically inevitable consequence of scientific exploration.   My argument thus depends on the very nature of scientific exploration and on the way that nature is illustrated in space science and other aspects of our space missions. For example, our mission to study the chemistry of Venus’ atmosphere led to the discovery of the depletion of the ozone layer on Earth.  Space telescope missions led to the discovery of Dark Energy, on the heels of the confirmation of the existence of Dark Matter, and to the realization that the standard model in physics accounts for only a very small percentage of phenomena in the universe.  Similar illustrations of serendipity can be found in practically all types of space missions.  They are more likely the more our spaceships move into the unknown. And they will help us discover hitherto unsuspected problems and transform science so as to place us in a better position to find solutions.

Speaker
Biography:

Humphrey Kalibo interested in the application of geospatial technology (remote sensing and GIS) in the management of natural resources, notably forests. A native of Kenya, I recently completed a doctorate in Geography from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. My previous work has focused on participatory ethnobotanical research where I argue that traditional ecological knowledge and people's perception of resources is a critical component to adaptive collaborative management. He is currently seeking a position where he can use both participatory and geospatial techniques in resource management, especially in developing countries where livelihoods are still dependent on a vibrant natural resource base.

Abstract:

Vegetation fraction (VF) greatly influences crucial processes like photosynthesis and evapotranspiration. However, it is among the least studied of the biophysical parameters, yet it is needed in several applications, notably estimating soil erosion, analysis of carbon storage estimates, and development of atmospheric models, which have policy implications regarding climate research. Existing methods for deriving VF, e.g., using satellite imagery and spectral mixture analysis have limitations. Consequently, an alternative methodology for quantitatively estimating this parameter for different vegetation types, especially over the growing season, is needed. This study describes a simple technique for estimating VF that combines the power of spectral vegetation indices (VIs) and the simplicity of digital photography. It employs upward-looking hemispherical photographs of twelve deciduous tree canopies and eight VIs calculated from in-situ single-leaf level reflectance data to calculate VF. When plotted over time, the VIs showed very similar seasonal patterns as the photo-derived VF of each tree, and the VF values estimated by the VIs were temporally similar for each tree over the growing season. NDVI and SAVI had the highest estimation accuracy. SR showed temporal similarity with the VF of low-foliage trees, and had considerably higher accuracy of prediction. Seasonality and amount of foliage cover significantly affected estimation accuracies. This methodology is simple, inexpensive, and could be adapted to other settings. It can complement existing methods, and can potentially be used to study other critical parameters such as LAI and biomass in other types of vegetation, but further research is needed to validate it.

Speaker
Biography:

He was leading the detector group at ESO. Since his retirement he holds an emeritus position at ESO and is still actively pushing the development of eAPD technology which has been recently deployed in the GRAVITY instrument at the VLTI.  For more than three decades Gert Finger has developed infrared arrays for astronomy and deployed them in many instruments at the European Southern Observatory. 

Abstract:

To conduct high angular resolution observations of astronomical objects from ground based observatories, adaptive optics is needed to correct the images distorted by atmospheric turbulence. For the adaptive optics (AO) systems, low noise high speed near infrared sensors are needed for wavefront sensing and fringe tracking. Until now the performance of those sensors was based on CMOS detectors. Due to the high analog bandwidth needed for achieving frame rates of 1 KHz the readout noise severely limited the sensitivity. The only way to overcome the CMOS noise barrier is the amplification of the photoelectron signal directly at the point of absorption inside the infrared pixel by means of the noiseless avalanche gain.

A breakthrough has been achieved with the development of the near infrared SAPHIRA 320x256 pixel electron avalanche photodiode arrays (e-APD) which have already been deployed in the wavefront sensors and in the fringe tracker of the instrument GRAVITY at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer VLTI located on Cerro Paranal in Chile. 

Results obtained with this new technology will be presented. The detectors now show flat response with high quantum efficiency in the wavelength range from 0.8μm to 2.5 um. Subelectron readout noise at frame rates of 1KHz has been demonstrated. The dark current is as low as 0.02 e/s/pixel for an APD gain up to 8. With this performance, e-APD arrays also have the potential to outperform conventional large format NIR science focal planes.

For AO systems of extremely large telescopes and for co-phasing segmented mirror telescopes larger formats are needed. Therefore, a 512x512 pixel SAPHIRA array optimized for AO applications will be developed, which has 64 outputs operating at 10 Mpixel/s/output. This corresponds to frame rates of 2 Kframes/s for a full single frame readout. The design of this large format SAPHIRA array will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Marcos Diaz is a Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. He received his Electrical Engineering degree in 2001 from University of Chile, his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 2004 and 2009, respectively from Boston University. His research interests are related to the study of ionospheric turbulent plasma, incoherent scatter radar techniques, low-frequency-radio-astronomy/space instrumentation and nano-satellite technologies.

Abstract:

Developing countries and their educational institutions are taking advantage of the Cubesat standard in order to either accelerate or even start space programs. Chile, and in particular the University of Chile, has started a space program based on Cubesats. The first university Cubesat, the Satellite of the University of Chile for Aerospace Investigation 1 (SUCHAI-1), is awaiting launch in a Falcon 9 (Space X). SUCHAI-1 was a proof of concept with simple payloads and experiments. We present the learned lessons of SUCHAI-1 and the process of starting a university program funded by sources external to the university in a country without a space agency nor a space program. We also present the university new space mission, which continues the efforts of the first one. The new mission under development involves the construction of 2 3U Cubesats, SUCHAI 2 and 3. The main payloads under design for this mission, and eventually for future more dedicated missions, are: magnetometers, Langmuir probes, dual frequencies GPS receivers and radio beacons. These payloads expect to gather information of the ionosphere. In particular, we will show the current status of the payloads, paying attention to the first designs of them together with the current performance. We analyze the type of physics we might obtain with these instruments and with the fusion of data among them as well as with ground based instruments such as GNSS receivers, magnetometers networks, ionosondes and Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs).

Speaker
Biography:

Ben Jarihani is a postdoctoral research fellow at Sustainability Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast working on erosion estimation and sediment transport modelling with collaboration with CSIRO. He received bachelor and master of engineering in irrigation, drainage and water resources management (1996-2001), followed by eight years industry work experience as a professional water engineer, hydrologist and project manager. He has done his PhD in hydrological sciences at University of Queensland, Australia with collaboration with CSIRO (2011-2015) entitled “developing remotely-sensed data approaches to studying hydrological processes in data-poor dryland landscapes”. Jarihani research interests include application of remote sensing and geographic Information system in water resources management and hydrological/hydrodynamic modelling. He has published several papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an active reviewer of repute. He received European Geosciences Union 2011Outstanding Student Poster awards in hydrological science, The University of Queensland Research Scholarship and The Integrated Natural Resource Management top-up scholarship from CSIRO.

Abstract:

Drylands occupy one third of the Earth’s surface and are home to around 400 million people, yet the water resources of these regions are often poorly understood because of a lack of fundamental hydrological data. Thus fundamental questions of (eco) hydrological function of these river systems cannot be understood at a detailed scale. Earth observation satellites have been proved to provide data and information on water cycle in multiple spatio-temporal scales.

 This research project aims to develop remotely-sensed data approaches in order to improve our understanding of hydrological processes in data-sparse dryland landscapes. Four objectives were investigated: (i) to evaluate the accuracy and effectiveness of satellite derived altimetry data for estimating flood water depths in low-gradient, multi-channel rivers; (ii) to detect and map flood extents and optimize the trade-off between image frequency and spatial resolution using Landsat and MODIS satellites imagery; (iii) to assess satellite-based Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) accuracy for hydrodynamic modelling; and (iv) to use a hydrodynamic model supported by satellite-derived data to investigate flood water transmission loss.

 This research concluded that it is now possible to realistically constrain water balances in data-sparse dryland rivers using hydrodynamic models in combination with satellite-derived data to address limitations in the availability of conventional hydrological datasets. This research has implications for the opportunities, limitations, and future directions of using remotely-sensed data to better understand water balance and hydrodynamics of data-sparse regions. This knowledge is imperative for improved management of the limited water resources in dryland, both in Australia and around the world.

Speaker
Biography:

Peter Johnson’s research area is in applied probability. To date he has mainly worked with optimal stopping and free boundary problems in the area sequential analysis. However, he also has a keen interest in HMM tracking algorithms, filtering theory and non-linear optimal stopping problems. He is very passionate about his research area, having worked hard to build new collaborative projects outside its traditional applications and has a strong ambition to lead this research area into new avenues in the future.

Abstract:

Detecting changes in random processes as quickly and accurately as possible, is important for many scenarios. Examples include: detecting a plane using radar; identifying nuclear material at ports; reacting to breakages in atomic clocks on satellites and; determining when is the best time to buy/sell stocks and shares. Using advanced applied probability, it is possible to provide an 'optimal' time to stop and declare that a change has occurred (optimal in the sense of minimising the delay after the change) with a fixed probability of error.

This collaborative work looks at problems of this type applied to issues in detecting breakages in clocks on board satellites. The sophisticated solutions of these optimal stopping problems show that the first hitting time of a test statistic to a defined boundary is the quickest possible decision time for a given level of accuracy (see Figure). This means that no other method can outperform the algorithms used, which is a valuable asset in high performance systems.

 

This research has two high profile satellite applications: The New Horizons mission, and The Galileo Project. Most recently solutions of this type have been involved in helping engineers from NASA detect an unusual change in the two on-board quartz clocks (which are replied upon to beam accurate data back to earth) as its satellite passed Pluto.

These methods are also helping resolve similar problems in detecting the breakages in the atomic clocks used in the Galileo project, the first global navigation system primarily for civilian use, that is being developed by the European Union. The accuracy of these clocks is critical to accurate positioning, with a 100 nanosecond error meaning positioning could be out by up to 30 meters on the ground.

Speaker
Biography:

Irena Ymeti is following the PhD program at the Earth Systems Analysis department at ITC, University of Twente, The Netherlands working on monitoring soil aggregate breakdown using Remote Sensing technology. She started to work at the Institute of Geosciences, Energy, Water and Environment at the Polytechnic University of Tirana, Albania. Building a geo-information (GIS) and RS laboratory for processing and analyzing data for earth science applications was the focus on her  work.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Monitoring of soil aggregate breakdown still remains a challenge. Using remote sensing approach changes on soil surface such as soil aggregate breakdown that occur over a short period of time can be detected in a fast and non-destructive way. To understand these changes it is important to monitor the interaction between soil surface and the surrounding environment at high temporal resolution. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: We designed an outdoor experiment to monitor soil aggregate breakdown under natural conditions at a micro-plot scale using a regular digital camera. Five soils susceptible to detachment (silty loam with various organic matter content, loam and sandy loam) were photographed each day. We collected images and weather data from November 2014 until February 2015. When an image has a sufficient high spatial resolution, pixels are smaller than the object so grouping of pixels is possible in order to obtain real-world homogeneous features. Object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach, which allows estimation of the image area occupied by soil aggregate was used. OBIA consider not only the spectral reflectance and neighbour relations, but also the shape and the size of objects. Findings: Our results show that the image area covered with soil aggregate decreases over time. The trigger that initiates the decrease of area covered with aggregate is freezing-thawing followed by the rain events. Conclusion & Significance: This research concludes that when dealing with images with very high spatial resolution object based approach should be consider for monitoring soil aggregate breakdown. The OBIA approach allows to quantify the image area covered with soil aggregate.

Speaker
Biography:

Gloria Garcia-Cuadrado is President & CEO of Celestia Aerospace, a company devoted to the opening of space access to SMEs and research groups through the use of nanosatellites. She firmly believes a new economy of space has to be developed for the benefit of all. Garcia-Cuadrado is Theoretical Physicist graduated from the Physics Faculty of the University of Barcelona; Master in Theoretical Physics; and Diploma in Space Studies, specialization in Space Business and Management, by the International Space University (California; U.S.A). She has been researcher at the Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia; Head of Human Space Flight and Advanced Concepts at the Aerospace Research & Technology Centre; and General Director of the Aerospace Cluster of Catalonia, gathering more than 80 Enterprises, University, Technology Centers and Government, devoted to enhance the aerospace industry. She is also a passionate advocate for scientific education and communication..

Abstract:

Space is still a frontier. The advantages of research in microgravity conditions are still somehow a private niche of the big aerospace contractors and main space agencies. But the landscape is changing and an incipient effort is being pursued to open space frontiers to small and medium-sized companies, universities, under-developed countries and non-profits. We will revise the advantages of microgravity research and a tool to conduct it at low-cost, rapid response and flexibility through the use of nanosatellites opening thus space frontiers to a wide audience. These highly capable satellites can support a wide range of mission objectives, from pure research to technology demonstrators and space qualification tests. The small satellites market  is valued 600 M USD to 1.000 M USD yearly with an estimated 2.200 to 2.700 needed launches in the 2015-2020 timeframe. We will also introduce a new launcher under development to serve specifically the nanosatellite incipient market to help solve the scarce launching opportunities served today by conventional launchers.

Ignacio Barrios

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid
Spain

Title: ESAT, the educational satellite
Speaker
Biography:

Ignacio Barrios has his expertise in Space System Engineering. He started as an AOCS engineer working for different kinds of missions such as Earth Observation and Rendez-vous missions in SENER, Spain and EADS Astrium Toulouse, in France. He was soon interested in satellite AIT and got the chance to work as a System Engineer for the first Cubesat at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid. This gave him the chance to learn about all the different phases of a satellite project very deeply from Mission Analysis to Operations. He has been always attracted by education and during his career he has paid attention to the different ways to train new engineers. He also teaches and shares his experience so that young engineers can benefit from his experience. 

Abstract:

The Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) started in the academic year 2009/10 educational innovation activities in space engineering. The implementation of several topics in the Conceive - Design - Implement – Operate (CDIO) syllabus was pursued, mainly focused on the next topics: Hardware and software integration, Test, Verification, Validation and Certification.

With this objective the use of demonstrator satellites was included in the practical lessons. The development of a self-designed demonstrator satellite was started leading to the ESAT’s birth.

ESAT has been created and developed by Theia Space, an initiative born at the Spanish User Support and Operations Center (E-USOC) which belongs to the UPM and is one of ESA’s delegated centers for the operation of scientific payloads onboard the International Space Station.

ESAT is an educational satellite designed for hands-on learning for all education levels: STEM education, university studies and professional training. It is a 10x10x10 cm nanosatellite based on the successful CubeSat standard and weighing less than 1 kg.

ESAT has the typical spacecraft subsystems: Electrical Power, Command and Data Handling, Attitude Determination and Control and Structure.

The user can choose to focus and work on each subsystem independently or to practice with the fully integrated satellite. ESAT features a Wi-Fi communication system allowing the connection with a PC, where the ESAT GUI allows an easy operation of the satellite.

ESAT is perfectly fitted to train on design, manufacture, integration, validation and operation of satellites.

It has been developed with the open source philosophy and the users are able to expand its functionalities. ESAT allows to integrate and test new user developments, both SW and HW. For the HW developments the user has access to all the lines in the satellite, including power and communication lines and analog and GPIO lines.

Speaker
Biography:

Eva Tresaco obtained her degree in Mathematics in 2003, and her PhD in 2010, both from University of Zaragoza. She has gained experience in research, teaching and administration both in aerospace companies and institutions of higher education. Currently she works as Associate Professor at the Centro Universitario de la Defensa Zaragoza (Spain). Her main research interests are Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Systems where she has coauthored over 20 scientific papers, and she has participated in many research projects. She is Senior Member of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, an also member of Sociedad Española de Matemática Aplicada

Abstract:

Satellite constellations are groups of satellites working cooperatively and following the same goal. In this work, we recall different ways to design satellite constellations. Satellite constellation design has been since its beginning a process that required a high number of iterations due to the lack of established models for the generation and study of constellations. This situation resulted in the necessity of specific studies for each particular mission, being unable of extrapolate the results from one mission to another. Fortunately, in the last decade, new theoretical models were developed that include in their formulation all the former configurations. One of these models is the Flower Constellations (cf. [1]). In this work we present these constellations along with the 2D-Lattice Flower Constellation theory (cf. [2, 3]), which represents an improvement of the original theory since its formulation is simpler and has a physical meaning. We focus on the application of the theory of necklaces to the determination of the reference orbit of the constellation. This approach opens new design possibilities and brings what we named Necklace Flower Constellations (cf. [4]). Finally, we introduce a time distribution methodology (cf. [5]) to generate constellations whose satellites share a set of relative trajectories, and maintain that property over time without orbit corrections. This distribution methodology is able to generate all kinds of satellites configurations including equally spaced time distributions (as the Flower Constellations Theory does) but also formation flying. To sum up, we will present examples of missions in which the satellites present the ground-track repetition property, constellations based on high eccentricity orbits and formation flying designs.

Speaker
Biography:

Giancarlo Genta is Professor of Construction Machines at the Politecnico (Technical University) di Torino. He is member of the Academy of Sciences of Torino and of the International Academy of Astronautics. Since 2012 chairs study group SG 3.16 of the International Academy of Astronautics: Global  human  Mars  system missions exploration, goals,  requirements  and  technologies.

In 2013 received the Yangel Medal for outstanding contributions to the development of the international space sciences and technologies and the Engineering Science Award of the International Academy of Astronautics for outstanding achievement in engineering science

He authored 90 papers, published in Italian, American and English Journals, 268 papers presented to symposia and 25 books, some of which are used as textbooks in some American Universities.

He is also the author of two science fiction novels, published in Italian, English and Ukrainian.

Abstract:

Initially space exploration was based on a direct involvement of governments. The main reasons were the general cold war climate, the programmatic non-existence of a private sector in one of the main actors (the Soviet Union) and perhaps also the novelty of this enterprise, allowing to forecast that its cost was beyond the possibilities of any private organization.

Consequently, the main international treaties dealing with this subject were heavily influenced by the belief that states were the actors in space and that  exploration could be peaceful only if everything of value existing beyond Earth was considered as belonging to humankind in general, and could be exploited, if at all, in the interest of all.

Space activity allowed the development of a space industry. The governmental agencies (and the military) were the customers of these companies, and managed the missions directly. Slowly, a new model started emerging, with space agencies not dealing with all kinds of space activities, leaving all the industrial ones, in particular telecommunication, metereological and Earth resources satellites, to private companies, concentrating on their main business, namely science and exploration.

Later, starting with 2000, the idea that also in science and exploration missions space agencies should buy many services from private companies emerged, with transportation to LEO operated by privates. The launchers for scientific and exploration missions should not only be built, but also studied, designed and operated by privates.

Exploration missions could be completely run by private enterprises that decide their goals, recruit the crew (if any), build the equipment, operate the mission and finally own the outcome, of whichever nature it is.

Private exploration is possible only if the outcome of the mission is lucrative enough to justify the investments and the risks, like it was the case of the sea exploration journeys of the sixteenth Century.

Ugo Cortesi

Institute for Applied Physics “Nello Carrara” (IFAC-CNR)
Italy

Title: AURORA project: a challenge for synergistic exploitation of Sentinel-4/-5 ozone operational products
Speaker
Biography:

Ugo Cortesi is a research scientist with 25-year experience in the field of Earth Observation and, in particular, in remote sounding of the Earth’s atmosphere. His activity focused on a variety of subjects: from design and development of atmospheric emission sounders, to engineering and scientific campaigns on-board high altitude platforms, to atmospheric data validation, to radiative transfer applied to forward and inverse modeling, to development and application of data fusion techniques. He is currently a member of the Mission Advisory Group of Sentinel-4 and Sentinel-5 and is acting as the scientific coordinator of the AURORA project funded by the European Commission in the Horizon 2020 Framework Program.  

 

Abstract:

An unprecedented quantity and quality of data on the Earth’s atmosphere will become available with the launch of the Sentinel-4 and Sentinel-5 operational missions of the Copernicus Program by the early 2020. The extraordinary amount of information associated to the geostationary (S-4) and Low Earth Orbit (S-5) measurements will shed new light into our understanding of air quality, climate, ozone and solar radiation. The envisaged advancement in atmospheric monitoring capability and the need to manage the volume and complexity of the data stimulated the investigation of an innovative approach to synergistic exploitation of measurement products. The AURORA H2020 project (2016-2019) is currently developing, implementing and testing a new concept based on combined use of data fusion techniques and data assimilation models to derive advanced quality products for vertical profiling of ozone from the surface to the top of the atmosphere. The ultimate goal of the scientific and technological effort of the project is to demonstrate the comparative advantages of the assimilation of fused products versus assimilation of standard operational products. Advanced quality ozone profiles will then be used to calculate tropospheric partial columns and UV surface radiation products, which might foster the development of pre-market applications, for instance in the health sector. Along with the scientific background and core elements of AURORA, a synthetic insight will be offered into the technological infrastructure constituting at the same time the set of tools for building the system and the overall assembly as final product of the project in itself. The focus on applications will aim to describe their relevance for demonstration purposes, as well as in the perspective to possible follow-up of the concept extended to a variety of atmospheric targets and application sectors.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Simona-Mariana Cretu was born in Craiova, Romania (1960). She received a BSc degree in mechanical engineering in 1984, and a PhD degree in mechanisms in 1999, from the University of Craiova. From 1984 to 1992 she was a Research Engineer at the Research Laboratory for CAD Systems, ICMET, Craiova. Since 1992, she has been working in the Department of Applied Mechanics and Civil Engineering, Faculty of Mechanics, Craiova, where she is currently a Professor. She wrote scientific papers and books in the fields of mechanisms, biological robots, creative techniques, philosophy and history of science. She realized new models for legged robots and viruses inspired from nature, and proposed a new interpretation of Plato’s books.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: During the process of scientific creation innovators can apply creativity techniques either intuitively, either by using the most appropriate research methodology. A research methodology can use present or historical knowledge. Many scientific matters of current interest are described in Plato’s work, and some contradictory topics from his work are still debated. A short overview referring to the methodological rules from Plato’s work - which have not been exceeded - is considered to be necessary. The aim of this paper is to promote the utilization of the appropriate research methodology in the process of scientific creation in the field of mechanical systems and bionics, to present some applications, as well as focusing our attention on new historical research with useful results in the present. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Some of the streams used in solving difficult problems are: experimental analysis, thought experiments, visual analogy, inventive principles recommended by TRIZ method (the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving), and maintenance of the idea in long-term-memory. Findings: The paper presents the author’s point of view referring to the interpretations of Plato’s books. Some new applications of Plato’s ideas in mechanical systems are included. The author’s strategy utilized in the process of scientific creation in bionics was applied to obtain several biological robots and models of mechanical systems inspired from nature, e.g. viruses. The applications of TRIZ method in the field of mechanisms and robots, even for the calculus, e.g. global mobility, are obtained. Conclusion & Significance: The author aims for the paper to be useful to other young researchers who strive to improve their strategy in the process of scientific creation. In addition to that, the paper encourages researchers from different fields to collaborate together for solving the contradictions from Plato’s work.

Speaker
Biography:

Wang has developed computer models for weather prediction since 1991 in Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau. He has developed  tools for modeling global chemistry and air pollution since 1995 when he did his PhD work in Cambridge University with Professor John Pyle in the Department of Chemistry. Wang has built a network of CO2 sensors to collect CO2 data over global oceans on a fleet of nine global container cargo ships operated by Evergreen Marine Corporation (EMC) since 2009. Started from 2006, Wang has used FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data to build tools for studying climate change. Wang has partnered with EMC, China Airlines, Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration, Tao-Yuan Environmental Protection Bureau, Le & Der Co. Ltd., Cambridge University, CPC Corporation, European IAGOS-AISBL consortium, University of Stockholm, Landseed Hospital, and Taiwan National Space Organization to develop new tools and collect new data that can help managing air pollution and climate change problems.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports has made predictions of a persistent and wide-spread warming of temperatures close to the surface over the entire globe in the 21st century (IPCC, 2013). How realistic are the predictions made by the IPCC models, especially over the polar region where the highest increases in temperatures were predicted? Due to the lack of accurate temperature measurements over polar region, the estimate of temperature trends over the polar region remains to be determined. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: In this work we use profiles of temperature measurements from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3C) to determine global temperature trends during the period 2006-2016. Based on known sources from the radio waves provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS), the F3C uses radio occultation (RO) technique to obtain profiles of atmospheric temperatures from surface to 40-km altitudes. With a good global coverage by the F3C, we can work out temperature trends on a global scale. Findings: Distinctive warming over the northern hemisphere polar regions. This warming in the polar region, identified by the F3C observations, confirms the predictions made by the IPCC models.  The continuously warming trends in the polar region can lead to progressive reduction in sea ice extent, melting glaciers, etc. Our work with the F3C data proves that this terrifying picture is actually happening now. Conclusion & Significance: The F3C data demonstrates that significant warming has occurred during the period 2007-2016, and most pronounced warming areas have occurred over the polar region. The pronounced warming over the polar region are exacerbating sea ice lost, and melting glaciers. Satellite measurements are keys for mankind to continuously observe what have occurred over the polar region.

Philipp Hartlieb

Mining Engineering and Mineral Economics Montanuniversitaet Leoben
Austria

Title: Alternative fragmentation concepts for possible space mining applications
Speaker
Biography:

Philipp Hartlieb is a senior researcher at Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Austria. He holds a MSc in Applied Geosciences and did his PhD as member of the Chair of Mining Engineering of Montanuniversitaet Leoben on “Investigations on the effects of microwaves on hard rock” in 2013. He received the Hugh E. McKinstry Fund student research grant from the Society of Economic Geologists in 2007 and was ranked 1st at Young Researchers Competition, Saint Petersburg State Mining University (RUS) in 2010.

His current research focusses on microwave irradiation of rocks and ores with the goal of enhancing mechanical excavation tools and / or mineral processing and is sponsored by industry and research funds.

Abstract:

Extra-terrestrial mining means operating in remote areas under extreme radiation conditions and low gravity. These circumstances necessitate rethinking current excavation methods used for extracting raw materials from the earths’ crust. Especially the low-gravity conditions will change the way forces are applied to the rock mass in order to using its fragment size and subsequently processing it. With currently used machinery and technology mining machines are comparably heavy and apply high forces to the rock mass. Blasting will apply an even bigger shock wave causing fragmentation of ores. Since a) the application of high forces will not be possible in space and b) it is extremely expensive to transport heavy equipment to space alternative ways of rock fragmentation and excavation which mitigate these issues are widely investigated.

This paper will discuss the problems associated with mining in remote environments, especially under low gravity conditions as on asteroids or the moon. An overview will be provided on different alternative fragmentation concepts highlighting their pros and cons in this context. Special insights will be provided on the use of microwave irradiation of hard rocks and the consequences on excavation forces. Experimental results will be provided showing how microwave irradiation of hard rocks leads to a reduction of cutting forces by 10%.

George Zhou

Guilin University of Technology
China

Title: Future Intelligent Earth Observing Satellites
Speaker
Biography:

George Zhou received the Ph.D. degree from Wuhan University, Wuhan, China, with expertise in Earth Observing. He was a Visiting Scholar with the Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. He continued his research as an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow with the Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany from 1997-1998, and afterward became a Researcher with The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA from 1998 to 2000. Dr. Zhou has published 2 books and more than 300 peer-reviewed papers, and has worked on 48 research grant and contractors as a Principal Investigator or a Co-Principal Investigator.

Abstract:

This invited paper presents the future intelligent earth observing system (FIEOS) and event-driven earth observation concepts as well as their connections to societal benefits for both decision-makers and the general public. The elucidated linkage and flow of information from FIEOS to societal benefits is interoperable. With the envisioned FIEOS, this paper places an emphasis on (i) How to apply the FIEOS to increase the efficiency of monitoring natural disaster, to improve the natural disaster management, and to mitigate disasters through providing highly accurate, and reliable surveillance data for experts, analysts, and decision-makers; (ii) How to significantly increase and extend societal benefits to the future U.S. Earth observation application strategy in, for example, real-time response to time-critical events, and disastrous environmental monitoring. Therefore, this paper presents the analysis of FIEOS to society benefit in the realms: (i) reducing loss of life and property from natural and human-induced disasters, (ii) improving human health and well-being, (iii) improving wealth forecasting, (iv) supporting sustainable agriculture, and (v) serving lay people.

Huadong Guo

Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Title: Earth Observation from Large Platform and Moon
Speaker
Biography:

Huadong Guo was a Project Leader of over ten key programs related to Earth observation. For the past tens of years, he has been one of the Principal Investigators for Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 (JERS-1) SAR, ERS-1/2 SAR, Radarsat-1/2, Environmental Satellite, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, and Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) programs. He is currently with the Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Sciences, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing. He is also currently a Guest Professor of seven universities in China. He has authored or coauthored over 200 papers and 17 books. Prof. Guo is a member of the International SAR Working Group, the Chairman of the Association on Environment Remote Sensing of China, and the Secretary General of the International Society for Digital Earth. He is an Editorin- Chief of the International Journal of Digital Earth and a member of the CoDATA executive committee. He was a recipient of three national awards on science and technology and nine awards by the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Abstract:

The large manned objects flying in low Earth orbit, e.g., the U.S. and Russia’s human space vehicles, the International Space Station, and Chinese Tiangong experimental space laboratory, provide unique platforms for Earth observation. On the other hand, as the only natural satellite of the Earth, the moon can become a bran-new Earth observation platform. Both of these space vehicles and the moon can be categorized as large Earth observation platforms, which have many common advantages, such as holding various different kinds of Earth observing sensors, which can measure multiple environmental parameters simultaneously under the same view geometry, illumination and atmospheric conditions.

Accompanying the development of manned space flight programs, Earth observation activities from large space vehicles have acquired various and large amount of datasets using both handheld cameras by crewmembers and automated sensors installed onboard these platforms. These datasets have been applied in multiple geoscience studies, demonstrating the importance and uniqueness of studying Earth from a vantage point of large platforms. For instance, the first near global digital elevation model (DEM) was produced by data obtained during the shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM).

Our humanity are ambitious in deep space exploration and have achieved gratifying progress. One objective of the exploration is to build the livable base in other planets. Moon base building could be the most achievable step in the near future. After the moon base being constructed, Earth observation could be one of its three main objectives (two others are studying the moon itself and observing the deep space from it). Extending Earth observing activities from the traditional artificial satellites in lower Earth orbit to the moon may trigger revolutionary applications for the Earth system science study. The Earth-moon distance is far enough to ensure the sensors can collect datasets covering half of the Earth surface. By studying events captured in these datasets may reveal some new large scale natural phenomena on Earth. Furthermore, utilizing different kinds of Earth observing sensors deployed on moon, detecting different parameters of the Earth, we can study the mechanism of the global environmental change system. It is our believe that the Earth observation from large platform and moon  can play more important, and even unique role on Earth study in the future.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Amr Elgamal is a water resources engineer, working with Dar Alhandasah (Shair & Partners). Mr. Elgamal has over five years of working experience in hydrology, hydrogeology and flood risk management. Mr. Elgamal has been working with several international research and consultant entities and involved in a wide range of projects in the Middle East, Africa and South America. Mr. Elgamal is passionate about helping improve the life quality of communities facing water resources challenges. His research and projects are primarily focused on integrating sustainable solutions for flood risk and draught management.

Abstract:

The Magdalena River is the most important river in Colombia in terms of economic activities and is home to about 77% of the country´s population. The river faces water resources allocation challenges, which require reliable hydrological assessments. In this research the reliability of ground-based measurements, different satellite products of rainfall and their combinations are tested for their impact on the discharge simulations of the Magdalena River.

Two different satellite rainfall products from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) namely (TRMM-3B42 & TMPA), have been compared and merged with the ground-based measurements and their impact on the Magdalena river flows were quantified using the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) distributed hydrological model.

It has been found that the use of TRMM-3B42 satellite product does not produce a reliable estimation of the spatial and temporal rainfall patterns over the study area. The performance of TRMM products had clear dependence on elevation. On the other side, TRMM best performed over areas gently rolling landscape and mild rainy parts. For hydrological modeling purposes the two products did not reproduce reliable estimation for the discharge at the downstream. Both TRMM-3B42 and TMPA tended to suffer from a systematic overestimation of the peak flows.

The impact of merging the rainfall products with ground-based measurements to generate a continuous rainfall field over areas with sparse raingauges, was investigated. Merging the TRMM-3B42 product with ground-based measurements had a negative impact on the model efficiency compared to the case of using ground-based data only. Merging the TMPA product with ground-based measurements, had a marginally positive impact on the simulated discharge. The estimation of the heterogeneous rainfall patterns and the hydrological modeling of the Magdalena River can be improved by using an enhanced assessment of the complex rainfall fields on the basis of merged TMPA satellite rainfall and ground station measurements.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed B. Argoun is professor of Dynamics and Control of Aerospace Vehicles at the Department of Aerospace Engineering, Cairo University. Between 1999 and 2008 he was the director of the Egyptian Space Program and Manager of Egyptsat-1 satellite project.  During the period 1998-2003 he was the General Secretary of the Space Research Council in Egypt and the Head of the Space Sciences Division at the National Authority of Remote Sensing and Space Sciences.

From 1983-1988 Dr. Argoun was professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and worked at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. From 1981-1983 as a specialist of Nuclear Reactor safety. Dr. Argoun research interests are in Systems Control Theory where he published over 40 scientific papers and Small Satellite Design which he is currently interested in.

Prof.  Argoun is actively interested in space policies and strategies of developing countries and in particular in small satellites and their technology and applications. He wrote many articles about space programs in developing nations.

Abstract:

Over the past 25 years more than 50 countries have established Space programs for building and acquisition of technology of small satellites. Small Satellites are those weighting more than 20Kg to less than 200Kg. They are designed along the classical lines of design to perform typical missions like those of larger satellites. The first part of this paper focuses on the evolution of some of the most visible of these satellite programs in developing countries.

Miniaturized Satellites comprise various categories including microsatellites, Nano-satellites and Cube Sats. These are built to a much smaller sizes and weights through miniaturization of components and subsystems. This development has changed the focus of small satellite research from technology and operation to mission and utilization. The question now for satellite builders is not how to build, test and operate the satellite, but rather in what mission it could be employed? Since the emergence of this trend of building very small or miniaturized satellites, a large number of satellites have been launched and several categories and configurations were developed. However, a focus of the main mission of this group of satellites did not materialize.

This paper attempts to trace the major design and utilization trends of this category of satellites in developing countries. This includes design trends centered on production of integrated miniaturized components and subsystems, mission trends focusing on fleet launches and satellite formation and utilization trends varying from classical uses such as remote sensing to rescue missions and education.

Mario J. Pinheiro

Universidade de Lisboa
Portugal

Title: The Flyby anomaly in need of new physics?
Speaker
Biography:

Pinheiro spent a research period with the Industrial Plasma Engineering Group lead by Prof. John Reece Roth, at the University of Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Prof. Roth is a pioneer in the application of plasma propulsion in drone technology. His main scientific interests are Plasma Electrodynamics, Electromagnetic Propulsion and Fundamentals of Physics. He has been working in plasma processes modeling, and in the last years is dedicated to study advanced propulsion systems and try to understand the flyby anomaly. He is author of about 50 articles published in peer-reviewed journals and up to 60 papers presented at International Conferences. He has a degree in Physics from the University of Paris-Orsay and the PhD in Physics from the University of Lisbon.

Abstract:

The central task of dynamical astronomy is to obtain solutions for equations of satellite motion. This analytic methodology employs Newtonian dynamics with gravitational fields that pulls on matter to get it going. After 100 years the inception of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) by Einstein, a cornerstone of modern physics, even accomplished theories might have difficulty explaining a certain class of astronomical phenomena - in particular, small astrometric anomalies. At the end of the 19th century, astronomers discovered that the perihelion of Mercury was slowly advancing in a way that could not be explained by Newtonian physics. As it turned out, this small anomaly in Mercury's orbit has found an explanation in GTR. We may point four classes of astrometric anomalies: i) the flyby anomaly, addressed in this work; ii) the slow increase of the astronomical unit (AU), approximately the distance from the Earth to the Sun; iii) the Pioneer anomaly, which is now a  solved puzzle; iv)  the increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. The flyby anomaly has been a puzzling issue, addressed in the present work and by other numerous authors.

We suggest a possible theoretical explanation for the physical process underlying the unexpected orbital-energy change observed during close planetary flybys based on the new concept of topological torsion current (TTC). This approach is along the line of non-standard physical models used to explain the anomalous velocity increase by means of torsion gravity, the majority based on the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild program of constructive axiomatization of the geometric structure of spacetime. Our theoretical framework is classical and shows that there is an asymmetry when a spacecraft approaches a planet in prograde or retrograde direction, but the anomaly occurring only in retrograde direction.

Speaker
Biography:

Gustavo Mendoza Torres is an applied mathematician. He completed his PhD in Mechanical System Stabilization and Fuzzy Control, His personal interest for the application in aerospace systems is in the category of mechanicals systems for Nano-satellites. And apply his experience to build the inertial mechanicals systems controlled by fuzzy control, and obtain its position.

Abstract:

In this work, we propose a control system based on a Fuzzy Control in order to counter the chaotic Nano-satellite and position motion. The control is founded on the variation of angular acceleration from which the torque of an inertial system is modified. A disk and a DC motor compose the inertial system. We develop a fuzzy control algorithm for each axis, x, y. For each control algorithm, we include information in both directions x and y, and with their combination we get the control of the third axis. This control system can be adequate for using in low-orbit satellites. Through of an accelerometer we obtain the information of the axis x, y. To test the fuzzy control proposed, we built a scale model with the standard dimensions of a CubeSat. In this scale model was included the inertial system with the accelerometer and the tests of the fuzzy control conducted were under conditions of gravity on the Earth's surface. The control variables are specified by the value given by the accelerometer as input variable, and the pulse width of the DC current as output variable.  The processed information by the fuzzy control is sent to the DC motors, which handle the disks, generating the torque required to steady the chaotic and position of Nano-satellite movement. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dae-Eun Kang is a graduate student at Yonsei University. He is getting a master’s course in Department of Astronomy at Astrodynamics and Control Laboratory (ACL). He graduated from Yonsei University, Department of Astronomy in 2016.

Abstract:

Formation flying using small satellites can be operated with lower budget. There are various formation flying missions. A precise relative navigation system is required to operate the formation flying with good performance. Sometimes a laser distance meter is utilized as distance measurement data for precise relative navigation. Many previous studies [1-3] have used the laser distance data generated by software-based simulator which was formulated by femtosecond laser ranging theory. However, the previous studies did not include information from a real distance meter. The current study will present a real-time relative navigation test-bed based on GPS signal and miniaturized femtosecond laser distance meter. For this study, the laser simulator is developed to include actual hardware properties omitted in the former software-based simulator. An ultimate goal is to replace the laser data of software-based simulator with real measured data by the hardware of the laser distance meter. Short-distance simulations can be performed with a raw data measured by the distance meter. On the other hand, the measurement data should be generated by the simulator for long-distance simulations. To generate long distance information, the hardware properties should be improved to include the characteristics of design parameters and measurement errors. The design parameters in the simulator are modulated same as the manufactured instrument. The design parameters are associated with random noise of measured data. If a mathematical relation between them is deduced, the parameters can be estimated for a long-distance navigation in formation flying. The measurement errors of instrument contain not only errors of laser hardware parts but also errors of other device parts. The test-bed is developed by adding the errors of the device parts to the previous software-based data. With the integrated test-bed, the results can be used for a relative navigation utilizing femtosecond laser ranging data. The relative navigation algorithm developed in this study will be verified for spacecraft formation flying mission.

Speaker
Biography:

Valentine A Yankovsky is an Associate Professor in Atmospheric Physics of St. Petersburg State University (from 1990). In 1986, he has completed his PhD from SPBU “Laboratory studies of aeronomical reactions with participation of negative ions, excited oxygen atoms and molecules” which was based on his investigation of processes in the glow discharge oxygen plasma. His main fields are the atmospheric photochemistry in the MLT region, the sensitivity and uncertainty study of complex photochemical systems and the retrieval of ozone and atomic oxygen in the MLT. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Three small components of O(3P), O3 and CO2 in the daytime mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) of the Earth are responsible for the thermal regime of the atmosphere. Among these components only the altitude profile of ozone concentration can be measured by a direct method for absorbing radiation from the Sun or the stars in the UV range of the spectrum. However, this method is most often realized in the conditions of twilight, so cannot give an exhaustive presentation of the altitude profile of [O3] throughout the daytime hours. Height profile of the atomic oxygen is usually restored on the assumption that it is looped with ozone. Despite the attractiveness of this approach, it cannot explain the altitude profile of atomic oxygen above 96-98 km, where the ozone concentration decreases by catastrophic style. The CO2 concentration in the MLT region is usually retrieved indirectly by solving complicated kinetic problem for the non-LTE radiative transfer. The analogous difficulties of [O3] retrieval from the observation of emission in 9.6 μm band are explained by the complexity of the vibrational kinetics of O3 molecule. Retrieved values of both CO2 and O3 to some extent depend on a prior information about the O(3P) altitude profile. The problem can be solved by using individual proxy for each of the target component. Using a sensitivity study and uncertainty analysis of the contemporary model of O3 and O2 photolysis in the MLT, YM2011, we have tested three excited components; namely the electronic-vibrational excited molecules, О2(b1Sg+, v = 0, 1, 2), as [O(3P)], [O3] and [CO2] proxies. We conclude that in the altitude range of 50-85 km, simultaneously independent retrievals of [O3] and [CO2] are possible (see Figure 1); and in the range of 85-100 km, the emissions in three channels from the О2(b1Sg+, v = 0, 1, 2) molecules make it possible to retrieve the [O3], [CO2] and [O(3P)] simultaneously.

Speaker
Biography:

Leonid V. Ksanfomality has completed his PhD at the age of 31 years at the Abastumany astrophysical observatory and postdoctoral (professor) studies at the age of 46 years at the Space research institute, Moscow. His position is the Main researcher, Planetary Physics dept. He has published more than 300 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of scientific journals.

Abstract:

Some of exoplanets possess physical conditions close to those of Venus. Therefore, the planet Venus, with its dense and hot (735 K) oxygen-free atmosphere of CO2, having a high pressure of 9.2 MPa at the surface, can be a natural laboratory for this kind of studies. The only existing data on the planet’s surface are still the results obtained by the Soviet VENERA landers in 1975-82.

The VENERA TV experiments returned 41 panoramas of Venus surface (or their fragments). The experiments were of extreme technical complexity. They have not been repeated by any space agency in the subsequent 40 years. The VENERA panoramas have been treated anew by modern processing codes. Relatively large objects, from a decimeter to half a meter in size, with an unusual morphology have been found which moved very slowly or changed slightly their shape. Certain unusual findings that have a structure similar to the Earth’ fauna and flora were found in different areas of the planet. Analysis of treated once again VENERA panoramic images revealed objects that might indicate the presence of about 11 or 12 hypothetical items of Venusian flora and fauna. Among them is ‘amisada’ that stands out with its unusual lizard shape climbing up at stone plates surrounding it.

Speaker
Biography:

L.I. Miroshnichenko is working at IZMIRAN, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics Lomonosov Moscow State University (SINP MSU)), RUSSIA. He published many articles in national and international journals.

Abstract:

Near-Earth's environment can be considered as a unique place where different space radiation fields are co-existing and can play a significant role in the estimation of radiation risks both for robotic and manned space missions. One cannot exclude the synergetic effects for particular spacecraft orbits as the result of simultaneous impact of the different radiation fields.

      Modern state of the problems related to Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) of Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) is critically analyzed based on available direct and proxy data. We also consider extremely large fluxes on non-relativistic solar energetic particles (SEP). Special attention is paid to recent debate on validity, origin and properties of the events AD775 and AD1859 (Carrington event). We demonstrate that, in spite of existing uncertainties in proton fluences above 30 MeV, all of them are fitted well by a unique distribution function, at least, with present level of solar activity. Extremely large SEP fluxes are shown to obey a probabilistic distribution with a sharp break in the range of large fluences (or low probabilities). The studies of this kind may be extended for the periods with different levels of solar activity in the past and/or in the future. Considering the recent confirmation of super-flares on solar-type stars, this issue merits attention.

      Dose rates at aircraft altitudes are also demonstrated during the GLE60 (15 April 2001) along two actual flights (computed from the GLE parameters deduced by different groups), as well as ambient dose equivalent during GLE69 (20 January 2005) computed by different groups for three assumed flights. 

      We consider some examples of using of the models to estimate changes of radiation hazard in the interplanetary space for the expected reduction of solar activity during the nearest solar cycles 25-26.

Alexander V. Bagrov

Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INASAN)
Russia

Title: Single-satellite global positioning system
Speaker
Biography:

Alexander V. Bagrov as astronomer studies minor bodies of our Solar System. Besides that he was lieder of Russian team that worked out space optical interferometer for precision measurements of stellar coordinates. When this project was cancelled due lack of financial support, he proposed a conception of single-satellite global positioning system for 1-mm accuracy geodesy and for improvement of selenodetic coordinate frame. In the field of space technique he proposed interstellar spaceship with super-conductive magnet mirror, lunar elevator, method of non-rocket launch from Mars, solar 3-D printer for lunar building. He honored by the Russian Cosmonautic Federation to be “Space Technique Constructor”.

Abstract:

The Earth global positioning systems are based on numerous set of geodetic space probes that send special signals to receiver on the Earth surface. These systems need simultaneous Earth-based precision astrometrical observations of every satellite spatial position, and even so the accuracy of instant positioning is only few meters. As for the Moon as well for the Mars, there is no global positioning system of this kind, and it seems that it never will be build. On the other hand we need to determine instant coordinates of points of interest on the lunar surface and coordinates of space probes near the Moon or landing to target point. To get it the Russian mission “Luna-25” will deliver to the Moon light beacons that will became referent points for precision selenodetic coordinate frame. The brightness of these light beacons will be enough for observation by any on-board TV-camera from near-Moon orbit and by Earth-based telescopes. In the case of from-orbit observations the angular position of the beacon relative to referent stars will be measured with support of onboard orientation system. Row of such angular measurements will provide us to calculate selenodetic coordinate (latitude) of the light beacon and instant coordinates of lunar satellite with accuracy about few meters by geodetic equalization methods. The “Luna-25” will be landed near lunar pole, so its beacon will be very good for latitudes measurements, but not suitable for longitudes. This problem will be solved by “Luna-26” mission, which will be a satellite on low polar lunar orbit. It will be supplied with laser projector to illuminate existing on lunar surface retro-reflectors and observe them as point-like sources. As existing retro-reflectors are not far from lunar equator, they will be good for longitudes determination.

Speaker
Biography:

Dmitry Pozdnyakov has his expertise in hydro-optics in application to environmental remote sensing. With his team he developed a set of biooptical models as tools for investigating natural turbid waters, which by nature are most challenging for remote sensing. Went through numerous verifications in a variety of marine and lacustrine water bodies, these tools were used by him in numerous studies in the area of aquatic ecology with special emphasis on the influence of ongoing climate change and anthropogenic forcing as well as aqua-ecological problems related to harmful and nuisance algae. Twice, in 1992 and 2005, he was recipient of the Chandler-Misener award.

Abstract:

Owing to developed original algorithms, multi-year time series of variations in the E. huxleyi blooming occurrence, surficial extent as well as the content of particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and partial pressure of CO2 (DCO2) in the North, Norwegian, Greenland, Barents and Bering Seas were obtained from OC CCI data for the time period 1998-2013.

The bloom areas in the North Atlantic-Arctic water are the lowest in the Greenland Sea (10000 -3000 km2) and by an order of magnitude higher in the Barents Sea. The same pattern holds for total PIC within blooms: 400-14000 t in the Greenland Sea and ~350 000 t in the Barents Sea.

Annually invariable spatio-temporal pattern of E. huxleyi blooming advancement across the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans is revealed. Starting from the southern Great Britain, blooms eventually appear firstly in the North and Norwegian Seas (in early June), then in the Greenland Sea (in late June), and finally in the Barents Sea (in late July-early September). In the Bering Sea the counter pattern is highly irregular: before and after the 1997-2013 period of high intensity of this phenomenon, the blooms are sporadic and their extent is insignificant. The bloom area extents and PIC contents in the Barents and Bering Sea are very similar. The assessed values of (DCO2) indicate that within E. huxleyi blooms the ocean CO2 absorption capacity is appreciably decreased. 

Speaker
Biography:

Victor Sergeevich Seleznev–Deputy Director of Geophysical Survey of RAS and Director of Seismological Branch of Geophysical Survey of RAS, Russia, city of Novosibirsk. His areas of expertise involve local and engineering seismology, geophysical methods of research of the Earth deep structure. The observation seismological net in earthquake-prone regions of Siberian part of Russia has been appreciably extended and equipped with modern recording equipment under his guidance, new prognostic geophysical testing areas are created and got further development, unique devoid world analogues technologies of active geophysical monitoring and deep seismic studies with powerful vibration sources have been accomplished. The technology of detailed engineer-seismological researches of buildings and constructions, based on standing waves studies has been developed. It allows giving an objective appraisal of the seismic resistance of different construction facilities and determining defects in objects. Technologies of seismic and electrical river exploration are created.

Abstract:

Researches are dedicated to the identification of parameters of meteoroid “Chelyabinsk” exploded on 15 February 2013. The explosion took place over the territory of Chelyabinsk region (Russia) in heavily populated area (Fig. 1). Bolide was caught on many surveillance cameras, dashboard cameras and mobile phones which videos were quickly spread all over the world through the Internet. Using these videos we defined the trajectory and traverse speed of meteoroid from the moment of first visible light and till the moment of disruption. At the moment of explosion acoustical wave set and when it reached the Earth's surface, it formed long-period (T~10-15sec) surface seismic wave registered at the distance of 1000 km. Waves of such type appear under nuclear and thermonuclear explosions in the air. There are methods to determine the energy of high-altitude explosion under the amplitudes of surface waves at a distance of it. We used the records of broadband seismic stations and at times of entrance this wave we determined exact explosion time – 03:20:34 UTC. According to amplitudes of the surface wave we estimated explosion energy in hypothesis that it was the point source similar to the altitude thermonuclear explosion. The energy of explosion according to data of 5 seismic stations was about 70 kt-140 kt (on the average, 100 kt) in the trinitrotoluol equivalent.

Speaker
Biography:

Yavor Shopov has completed his PhD from Sofia University, Bulgaria and postdoctoral studies from McMaster University, Canada. He is head of the University Centre for Space Research & Technologies, Sofia University. He is supervisor of Master programme on Aerospace engineering of small satellites of Sofia University. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute. Fields of research: applications of satellites in applied and fundamental research, space physics and solar- terrestrial physics, design and development of optical and spectral equipment for photographic observations and photometry in different regions of the spectrum.

Abstract:

Here we propose a space platform integrating telescope with an interchangeable head holding 5 receptors: NIR, MIR, FIR and VIS cameras and laser range meter. Such construction is very appropriate for using on micro satellites and space probes because it is much more compact and light than conventional payload with separate optics for each receptor. It allows high resolution imaging for Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) estimation of the wilting (water loss) of the vegetation to determine the degree of drying of plant, for monitoring the state of health of the vegetation, for early tracing of illness of plants, and to determine fire hazardous areas of dry vegetation in order to prevent forest fires. It is very useful for: prediction of forest fires; natural disaster warning; accurate determination of the area of ​​the forest fire-affected areas and to monitor fire hazard areas of dry vegetation. Most effective and precise method for remote localization of forest fires is with mid-IR (MIR) camera, mounted on board of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or high resolution satellite. MIR camera “sees” clearly the hot spot of the fire even through dense smoke which is impossible for observations in the visible range of the spectra. Therefore they are particularly useful for localization of the hot spots of forest fires and their extension. FIR camera allows location of entrances of underground facilities due to temperature difference of the ambient air and this coming from the facility. At the same time laser ranging is very useful for space surveillance and tracking of space debris, etc. Presented Laser-gated imaging for debris observation/detection use common telescope with other cameras

Speaker
Biography:

Aleksei Vladimirovich Liseikin – geophysicist of Seismological Branch of Geophysical Survey of RAS, Russia, city of Novosibirsk. In 2002 he is graduated from the Novosibirsk State University. He is PhD in geological sciences since 2009. His areas of expertise involve local and engineering seismology, geophysical methods of research of the Earth deep structure. He develops methods of seismic monitoring of the state of large buildings and equipment.

Abstract:

6.12.2016 at 18:36 local time (18-36 UTC) on the territory of the Republic of Khakassia there was a rare astronomical phenomenon that thousands of people could see – it was a fall of large enough astronomical body. In spite of the fact that this fall didn’t cause damage it was necessary to say that the most powerful impact wave was near high-security objects – Maina and Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP. The last one was equipped with the local seismological net which the explosion impact wave was recorded on. (Fig. 1). The analysis of data from surveillance cameras and dashboard cameras showed that the azimuth of meteoroid trajectory was 135°±10°, and the luminous trace finished over the seismological net surrounding Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP. The interpretation of seismologic data let us specify in a substantial way the trajectory of bolide flight and determine the territory of potential falling out of meteor body fragments. At the moment of explosion there was a surface seismic wave which amplitude was incomparably lower than same of “Chelyabinsk” meteoroid explosion and it was recorded only by seismic stations situated at the distance of 10 km from the epicentrum.

Ahmed Hafez Mohammed Ibrahim

Al-Azhar University Faculty of science
Egypt

Title: N –Body problem: The Theory and Application
Speaker
Biography:

Ahmed Hafez Ibrahim has completed his MSc degree in Space Dynamics from Al-Azhar University in August 2014. He is an Assistant Lecturer and PhD student at Faculty of Science of Al-Azhar University He got prize the best MSc thesis in astronomy field from Faculty of Science. He is working to finalize his PhD degree.

Abstract:

The history of the n-body problem: when appeared this problem? Who scientist and researches help in solutions of this problem?  Examples of the n-body: two body problem, three - body problem and four- body problem. Types of solutions are used as analytical solution, numerical solution, semi-analytical solutions, qualitative solutions and quantitative solutions .types of restrictions are used to solve n-body problem. Types of systems of equations are used to solve n-body problem: Newtonian equations of motion and Hamiltonian equations. Application of n-body problem on Sun-Earth-Moon-Spacecraft, treatment this problem as a restricted four-body problem finding liberation points as special solution. These liberation points can use in space mission as parking orbit or space station. The effect of solar radiation in these liberation points is studied.  

Speaker
Biography:

Zaynulla Zhumaev got his practical experience in aerospace engineering on microsatellite project Tablet Sat-Aurora, developed and launched by SPUTNIX in 2014. Currently he is responsible on product line marketing and sales in the same company. SPUTNIX OOO is a private Russian aerospace company established in 2011. Core team started their career on Chibis-M microsatellite ADCS developing project.

Abstract:

Cubesat standard was created to democratize access to space for students. Nevertheless, development of cubesat mission is still challenging today. Typical cubesat components are quite expensive even for top-level universities. There are already some projects focused on reducing cubesat missions cost but problem is still unresolved. Moreover, time by time students are faced same development problems instead of focusing on the subject of their cubesat mission.

Typical Cubesat OBC cost is more than 4000 euro, instead of it could be used COTS computer like Arduino or Raspberry-pi with cost is only around 40 euro. Raspberry-pi is a powerful computer with fully capable OS and plenty of already developed advanced software and libraries which are available for free. That’s why SPUTNIX decided to use Raspberry-pi as a core of SPUTNIX Cubesat product line.

Another feature is “SPUTNIX Cubesat API”. It is a software library for Raspberry-pi. The library will dramatically save on‑board software development time, allowing users to focus on high‑level algorithms and mission goal rather than solving tasks on low level programming.

SPUTNIX Raspberry Cubesat kit is designed for laboratory practice in school, university laboratories and for space mission as well.

The Cubesat product line will be available in 2 options: 1U Cubesat with coarse magnetic stabilization system, and 3U Cubesat with 3-axis ADCS. Each of the options is suitable for a variety of educational and applied tasks, including: design of nanosatellite, systems engineering, structure design, space missions planning, satellite mission control and telemetry processing, on-board software development, nanosatellite assembling, engineering tests, payload integration and its maintenance in laboratory and on orbit.

Imran Ahmad

Debre Tabor University
Ethiopia

Title: Spatial technology: Hydrological perspectives
Speaker
Biography:

Imran Ahmad has completed his Ph.D. in Environmental sciences from Tamil University, India in 2013. He received his B.Sc. degree from the University of Kashmir, India, in January 2004, followed by a M.Sc. degree in Environmental sciences from the University of Kashmir, India, in January 2008. He is an excellent researcher in the field of earth and environmental sciences. His research work has been published in various international journals such as Journal of Hydrology (Elsevier) and Environmental Monitoring and Assessment (Springer). Imran Ahmad is an editorial board member in several international journals, also acting as a scientific reviewer in many others. He is listed in the committee of the International Association of Management Science and Engineering Technology, Hong Kong, and he is the founding editor of a journal International Journal of Water Sciences, InTech (Croatia).

Abstract:

State-of-the-art geospatial technologies for imaging the earth and its subsurface are invaluable tools; especially when direct measurements are sparse or even impossible. Geospatial technology with their advantages of spatial, spectral and temporal availability and manipulation of data covering large and inaccessible areas within a short time have become very handy tools in accessing, monitoring and conserving groundwater resources. In hard rock terrain such as the Palar basin (South India), interpretation of satellite data for delineation of lithological units, weathered zones, mapping of lineament density and their trends as well as intensity, are discriminatory features and form a valuable aid for the location of groundwater areas..This paper mainly deals with the approach of geospatial technology to delineate groundwater potential zones in Palar basin, South India. Digitized vector maps pertaining to chosen parameters, viz. geomorphology, geology, land use/land cover, lineament, relief, and drainage, were converted to raster data using 23 m × 23 m grid cell size. The raster maps of these parameters were assigned to their respective theme weight and class weights. The individual theme weight was multiplied by its respective class weight and then all the raster thematic layers were aggregated in a linear combination equation in Arc Map GIS Raster Calculator module.

Speaker
Biography:

Joseph Olusola AKINYEDE: Prof. Joseph Olusola AKINYEDE is currectly the Director, Centre for Space Research and Applications (CESRA), Federal University of Technology, Akure (FUTA), Ondo state, Nigeria. He is charged with the responsibility of leading CESRA to complement the efforts of the Nigerian Space Research and Development Agency (NASRDA) in the implementation of the national space policy and programme. His administrative and technical expertise has assisted CESRA in pioneering international cooperation in university satellite technology development in Nigeria and space-based research in general, as well as capacity building in space science and technology at the postgraduate level. He has also served as a professor and Head of the Department of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geosciences Information System (GIS) in FUTA. Between 2009 and 2013, Prof. Akinyede served as the Executive Director of the UN-affiliated African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English (ARCSSTE-E), Ile-Ife, supervising the implementation of the UN mandate of research and capacity building in space science and technology for the Anglophone African countries. As the Director of space applications in NASRDA, from 2001 – 2009, he was instrumental to the production of the National Geoinformation Policy and the implementation of the Nigerian Space Policy and programmes, including the building and launch of NigeriaSats-1, 2 and X.

Abstract:

African countries are in fact in a fortunate position more than ever before. After declining through the 1980s and 1990s, the continent is now among the world’s most rapidly growing economic regions. Key social and demographic changes creating new domestic engines of growth in Africa includes an expanding labour force, increasing urbanisation, and the rise of the middle-class African consumer. While Africa’s resource sectors have drawn the most new foreign capital, it has also flowed into the agriculture, tourism, textiles, construction, banking, and telecommunications, as well as a broad range of industries. Rapid developments in satellite technology and its gradual adoption by African governments has brought positive economic consequences increasing their competitiveness and enabling developing nations to avoid years of gradual, costly technology adoption similar to what has taken place in the developed world. As the African economy continues to rise, satellite technology development and applications will therefore continue to play an increasingly important role in the African economy especially in the infrastructure and agricultural sectors where expenditures are rising significantly faster than in the world as a whole. In this paper, we examine the opportunity for satellite market growth in infrastructure and agricultural sectors where expenditures are rising significantly to meet the massive demand.

Biography:

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