Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Satellite & Space Missions Berlin, Germany.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Barbara Koch

Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg , Germany

Keynote: New perspectives of combined data sets for environmental information

Time : 09:05-09:30

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Barbara Koch photo
Biography:

Professor Dr. Barbara Koch studied Forest Sciences from 1977 to 1982 at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. From 1982 to 1994 she worked as a scientific staff member at the Institute of Land Use Planning and Nature Conservation at the Technical University of Munich (Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich). Today Ms Koch holds the chair of Remote Sensing and Landscape Information Systems at the Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg. She has worked in numerous research projects on remote sensing and geo-modelling in the frame of forest and landscape analyses. At this time, she is Academic Dean of the Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources, board member of the Centre for Renewable Energy, Head of the working group on Education of the University Centre for Sustainability and Transformation and Vice-Chairwoman of the Senate commission.

Abstract:

For environmental information it is of importance to link data from terrestrial measurements with remote sensing. Often vast terrestrial data sets exist as point data however for environmental studies area coverage is needed. In addition often different data sets need to be fused or connected to produce new information layers. Today a suite of remote sensing data is available connecting through different scales and providing different data properties which is complementary for more adjusted information. This talk will describe new developments and provide examples how the combination of satellite remote sensing data linked to terrestrial data will enhance the information value. The examples will refer to information provision in the field of renewable energy but also include examples for biodiversity studies, biomass studies and information for landscape analyses.

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Oyvind G Gron photo
Biography:

Oyvind G Gron is a Norwegian Physicist. He took the Cand. Real. Degree at the University of Oslo in 1973, majoring in Meteorology. He followed up with Dr. Philos. Degree in 1990 with a thesis on Repulsive Gravitation. He was appointed as a Professor at Oslo University College in 1994. He has also been Professor II at the University of Oslo since 1994. He has conducted research within the areas of general relativity, cosmology and classical electromagnetism. He has thrown new light on themes like the twin paradox, the physics in a rotating reference system and repulsive gravitation associated with vacuum energy. Together with Erik Eriksen at the University of Oslo, he has also studied properties of the electromagnetic field produced by accelerated electric charges. They have in particular shown how gravitation modifies such fields. He has also found new solutions to equations in Einstein's theory of gravity that describe time space where one can travel backwards in time. In several studies, he has focused on relativistic models of the universe. He has, among other things, shown that it is possible to interpret observations from cosmos so that the concept of dark energy is unnecessary. The relationship between gravitation and time and between gravitation and entropy are also themes where he has contributed several journal articles. He has 153 research articles, and has written 3 books on the theory of relativity published by Springer.

Abstract:

Schwarzschild presented his exterior and interior solutions a hundred years ago. They describe spacetime outside and inside an incompressible, spherically symmetric body. I give a review of these solutions and how they have been interpreted physically. Einstein predicted the existence of gravitational waves as a consequence of the general theory of relativity in June 1916. I briefly follow his thoughts about gravitational waves in the periods from 1016 to 1918 and from 1936 to 1938. The LIGO-detection of gravitational waves is reviewed. Consequences of this detection as investigated in later preprints are also discussed

Keynote Forum

Stanislav I Klimov

Russian Academy of Sciences (IKI RAS), Russia

Keynote: History and modernity of the study of Space Weather in Russia

Time : 09:55-10:20

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stanislav I Klimov photo
Biography:

Stanislav I Klimov Born on 27 June 1937 in Tula region, Russia. He is Head of Laboratory for Electro - Magnetic Emissions Investigation, Department of Space Plasma Physics, Space Research Institute (IKI), Russian Academy of Sciences. S. Klimov graduated from Department of Physics, Moscow State University (1966), received Ph.D. of physics-mathematics in 1984, Doctor of Sciences of physics-mathematics in 1994. Now he is the Scientific Manager of ASPI experiment INTERBALL TAIL PROBE and APW-R Relict-2 wave and field experiments and WEC Cluster wave experiment Co-I. The laboratory he leads also includes the electrostatic and magnetic cleanliness and EMC group. Now this group uses the experience from the previous projects for the study of the electro-magnetic environment of the MIR orbital station and in the future experiments of the International Space Station. He has more than 100 publications. His research interest includes: Waves in solar wind /magnetospheres and comet plasma interactions, magnetospheric convection and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, interaction of the supper large bodies (orbital station) with ionosphere.

Abstract:

The so called “simplest satellite” (or PS object) was launched on October 4, 1957. It was followed by the second spacecraft that for the first time brought a living creature, Laika the dog, into space on November 3, 1957. Officially both launches were dedicated to the International Geophysical Year: July 1 1957 – December 31, 1958. And only then it was the turn of the satellite, which had originally had to be the first. Dubbed “The Third Sputnik”, it was already a full-fledged spacecraft sporting all the systems inherent to modern ones. For the first time onboard devices received and executed commands sent from the ground. Instruments built by seven different groups of Soviet scientists operated onboard the satellite. Research results were downlinked to the Earth.

  • Track 02: Orbital Mechanics | Track 05: Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS | Track 06: Satellite Subsystems | Track 08: Satellite Communication | Track 09: Satellite Navigation | Track 15: LTE-based ground network and satellite networks
Speaker

Chair

Barbara Koch

Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg
Germany

Speaker

Co-Chair

Nicolas H Younan

Mississippi State University
USA

Session Introduction

Dennis Wingo

Skycorp Incorporated
USA

Title: ISEE III Reboot Project or How to Save an Interplanetary Spacecraft on a Shoestring Budget

Time : 10:35-10:55

Speaker
Biography:

Dennis Wingo is a CEO and Founder at Skycorp Incorporated, USA. He is having 36 Years of Industry Experience in the computer, academic, and aerospace industries. He worked for many leading edge companies during the 80's such as Vector Graphic, Symbolics, and Alpharel, pioneers in the computer, artificial intelligence, and document management industries. He has built flight hardware at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, including the first MacIntosh flown on the Space Shuttle and a small sat, SEDSAT 1, the first non NASA spacecraft built in Alabama. His first book, "Moonrush", and a chapter in another book "Return to the Moon" are about developing lunar resources. He contributed to a book "Toward a Theory of Space power" published by the National Defense University. He has written dozens of articles for various publications. I have two patents, one of them global.

Abstract:

The International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3) was one of a three spacecraft constellation, two by NASA and one by ESA, designed to extensively explore the earth’s magnetosphere and its relationship to emissions from the sun across a wide range of frequencies and particle energies. ISEE 1 and 2 were placed in a tandem highly elliptical orbit around the earth while ISEE 3 was placed into the earth-sun libration point 1 (ESL-1) in a halo orbit around the ESL-1 location to better enable communications with the spacecraft. ISEE-3 was the first spacecraft to fly in this orbit and it and its companions were instrumental in many engineering firsts and a plethora of science regarding what we now call solar-terrestrial physics. ISEE -3 was reborn as the International Cometary Explorer (ICE) when in 1983, through a complex series of lunar/earth flybys; it was placed into an interplanetary intercept orbit to pass within 8,000 km of the comet Giacobini-Zinner through its tail on September 11, 1985. Later it was tasked to flyby Halley’s Comet at a 21 million km distance, and to provide complimentary support to the NASA/ESA Ulysses mission in the 1990’s. In the late 1990’s ISEE-3/ICE was placed into hibernation with only its transmitter beacons providing indications of its existence. NASA in February of 1987 placed the spacecraft into an orbital configuration that would bring it back to the earth moon system in August of 2014, this is where our story begins. The space agency had eliminated it ability to command the spacecraft with the removal of the equipment designed for that task from the Deep Space Network. Due to the cost of the agency redesigning and rebuilding the equipment, and the competing needs of existing operational missions, the agency decided to forgo any attempt to contact the spacecraft in February of 2014. On April 12 2014 NASA gave preliminary permission for a private effort, led by Skycorp Incorporated and Spaceref Inc., to raise money and attempt to contact, revive, control, and place back into Earth orbit the spacecraft. Through a milestone based Space Act Agreement Skycorp and Spaceref were able to raise the funds through crowd funding and build an international technical team that, a mere 54 days later was able to command the spacecraft into engineering telemetry mode. Over the succeeding two and one half months, this international team, with foci at the world’s largest antenna at the Arecibo National Observatory in Puerto Rico, the Amateur Radio Satellite Organization-DL at the Bochum Radio Observatory in Nordrhein-Westfalen Germany, the Morehead State University Science Center, the SETI Institute’s Allen Array in Northern California, and Skycorp at NASA Ames in Mountain View California developed an Ad-hoc global network of ground stations and operations to bring the spacecraft back to life, commission a majority of science experiments, and resume limited science operations. Due to a pressurization failure in the propulsion system the team was unable to place the spacecraft back into earth orbit but did reach significant engineering and science milestones for the veteran spacecraft. This is our story.

Nicolas H Younan

Mississippi State University
USA

Title: Information retrieval from Earth Observation (EO) imagery

Time : 10:55-11:15

Speaker
Biography:

Nicolas H Younan is currently the Department Head and James worth Bagley Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Mississippi State University (MSU). He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees from MSU in 1982 and 1984, respectively, and the Ph.D. degree from Ohio University in 1988. His research interests include signal processing and pattern recognition. He has been involved in the development of advanced image processing and pattern recognition techniques for remote sensing applications, image/data fusion, feature extraction and classification, automatic target recognition/identification, and image information/data mining.

Abstract:

Earth Observations (EO) data are obtained from a multitude of sources and requires tremendous efforts and coordination among researchers and user groups to come to a shared understanding on a set of concepts involved in a domain. The ultimate goal of any EO system is to provide understanding, which will often require expertise and/or data sources from globally distributed resources, thus presenting unique challenges. To address these challenges, it is incumbent upon the global community to evolve and sustain a global observation network. These observations serve as the foundation for the models that are used to describe Earth processes. As this observational data accumulates in global archives, new opportunities become available for knowledge discovery about the Earth system. However, access to these observational data is optimized for the science teams for whom the instruments were launched and access by operational users may be problematic. This presentation will lay out some of the challenges for those engineers and scientists involved in pattern recognition in the Earth remote sensing arena. It describes the problem space for making decisions and introduces the concept of contextual remote sensing.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Barbara Koch studied Forest Sciences from 1977 to 1982 at the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. From 1982 to 1994 she worked as a scientific staff member at the Institute of Land Use Planning and Nature Conservation at the Technical University of Munich (Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich). Today Ms Koch holds the chair of Remote Sensing and Landscape Information Systems at the Albert-Ludwigs University of Freiburg. She has worked in numerous research projects on remote sensing and geo-modelling in the frame of forest and landscape analyses. At this time, she is Academic Dean of the Faculty of Environment and Natural Resources, board member of the Centre for Renewable Energy, Head of the working group on Education of the University Centre for Sustainability and Transformation and Vice-Chairwoman of the Senate commission.

Abstract:

Space-borne sensors allow for wide-scale assessments of forest ecosystem assessments. Combining the products of multiple sensors are hypothesized to improve the estimation of forest biomass. We applied interferometric (Tandem-X) and photogrammetric (WorldView-2) predictors, e.g. canopy height models, in combination with hyperspectral predictors (EO1-Hyperion) using 4 different machine learning algorithms for biomass estimation in temperate forest stands near Karlsruhe, Germany. We also estimated the spatial distribution of timber volume to calculate the regional potential for lignocellulosic raw material. Here we used a combination of airborne Lidar with Landsat TM 7 data linked with terrestrial inventory net data. To enhance the accuracy we developed a socio-economic predictor regarding the ownership and size of the woods. Finally we tested the accuracy of canopy top elevation, ground elevation and vegetation height (VH) derived from space borne full-waveform LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) ICESat/GLAS data across forested areas, as basis for the estimation of biomass. Computed height metrics from ICESat/GLAS data were compared against airborne laser scanning (ALS) based digital elevation models. Due to the dynamic topography of the sites under investigation, a wide range of slope angles could be investigated. ICESat's raw waveform data (GLA01) and the land surface altimetry data (GLA14) products were used to determine height metrics with different methods. The presentation will provide results of the different methods and sensors for vegetation height assessment, derived estimations on timber volume and above ground biomass.

Speaker
Biography:

Valentine A. Yankovsky is an Associate Professor in Atmospheric Physics of St. Petersburg State University (from 1990). In 1986 he has completed his PhD from SPBU “Laboratory studies of aeronomical reactions with participation of negative ions, excited oxygen atoms and molecules” which was been based on his investigation of processes in the glow discharge oxygen plasma. His main fields are the Atmospheric photochemistry in the MLT region, the Sensitivity and uncertainty study of complex photochemical systems and the Retrieval of ozone and atomic oxygen in the MLT. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

For daytime, the altitude profiles of concentrations of electronical-vibrationally excited molecules, O2(b1Σ⁺g, v=0, 1 and 2), depend on distributions of the O(3P), O3 and, partially, CO2 in the MLT region. It allows the use of emission bands originating from the O2(b1Σ⁺g, v= 0, l and 2) levels as a proxy for non-emitting, but it is very important for the atmospheric photochemistry, small components of the atmosphere. Contemporary model of O3 and O2 photolysis in the MLT, YM2011, has been investigated by methods of the sensitivity study and uncertainty analysis. It have been shown that simultaneously measuring of altitude profiles of two proxies concentrations, O2(b1Σ⁺g, v = 0) and O2(b1Σ⁺g, v = 1), allows to retrieve, simultaneously, profiles: [O3] and [CO2] in the range 50 – 90 km; [O(3P)], [O3] and, perhaps, [CO2] in the range 90 – 100 km (here, it is necessary to use a third proxy, O2(b1Σ⁺g, v = 2), in addition to the two above-mentioned); [O(3P)] and [O2] in the range 100 – 140 km. We believe that new remote sensing methods described above can be more fully realized as limb emission measurements from the satellite. Detailed description of the YM2011 model, database of the rate constants for aeronomical reactions, and applied analytical methods is given in the work: V.A Yankovsky et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2016)

Roman Ya Kezerashvili & Elena Ancona

The City University of New York, USA
&
Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy

Title: Orbital dynamics of a solar sail accelerated by thermal desorption of coatings

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Roman Ya Kezerashvli, Ph.D, D.Sc. in Theoretical Physics, has published over 170 papers, Professor of Physics, Corresponding Member of the International Academy of Astronautics.

Elena Ancona, Master of Science in Aerospace Engineering, 2016 from the Polytechnic University

Abstract:

For extrasolar space exploration it is convenient to take advantage of environmental effects, such as solar radiation heating, to accelerate a solar sail coated by materials that undergo thermal desorption at a particular temperature, reached at a particular heliocentric distance. This physical process of mass loss can provide additional thrust. We focus on the orbital dynamics of three scenarios that only differ in the way the sail approaches the Sun; in every case once the perihelion is reached, the sail coat undergoes desorption. When the process ends, the sail escapes the Solar System having the conventional acceleration of solar radiation pressure. We compare scenarios in which thermal desorption comes beside traditional propulsion systems, and they are the following: i. Hohmann transfer plus thermal desorption. The sail is carried as a payload to the perihelion with conventional chemical propulsion by a Hohmann transfer from Earth’s orbit to an orbit very close to the Sun (almost at 0.1 AU) and then deployed there. ii. Elliptical transfer plus Slingshot plus thermal desorption. In this case the transfer occurs from Earth’s orbit to Jupiter’s orbit where a Jupiter’s fly-by leads the sail close to the Sun, where it is deployed. iii. Two stage acceleration of the solar sail through thermal desorption. The sail has two coats of materials that undergo thermal desorption at different temperatures, so at different distances. The first desorption occurs at the Earth orbit and propels the sail toward the Sun, where the second takes place.

Speaker
Biography:

Joaquín Alonso Montesinos has completed his PhD at the age of 26 years from the University of Almería, Spain and postdoctoral studies from the same University. He is member of a research group ‘Solar energetic resources, Climatology and Atmospheric physics’ at the University of Almería. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals, has authored and coauthored different conference papers, both national and international, and has participated in different projects related to solar radiation. Furthermore, he is serving as reviewer in different impact journals.

Abstract:

In the search of technologies for improving the use of solar energy, remote sensing techniques has been widely employed for different purposes. In that sense, a great variety of resources are available in the market, and whole-sky cameras with fisheye lens have supposed a novel procedure for the solar resource assessment. The hemispherical vision of this kind of cameras provides real-time sky images where the different atmospheric features can be identified. However, saturations in the sun area provoke situations where the pixels can be mistakenly identified as clouds when the sky is free of clouds. In this work, two sky cameras with two different image processing have been used to identify clouds in the solar area: firstly, a sky camera (TSI-880 model) with rotating shadow band was used to identify clouds in the sun area following an algorithm based on direct normal irradiance (DNI); whereas the second methodology is based on a low-cost sky camera without the use of DNI. For two cameras, the solar area was processed to identify clouds according to an image processing based on the different channels from the images. In this case, both methodologies presented a cloud identification success rate higher than 90% for all sky conditions, being more accurate the low-cost camera in some particular situations.

Pier Matteo Barone

The American University of Rome
Italy

Title: From space to Earth: the GPR frontiers

Time : 12:35-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Pier Matteo Barone is an adjunct faculty member of the American University of Rome teaching courses on Archaeology, Geophysics, Geoarchaeology, Remote Sensing, and Forensics, as well as courses on the Preservation of Cultural Heritage. He is a recognized expert in Forensic Geoscience employed to testify in criminal and civil cases. He is currently engaged in a three-year research project with the geological institute of CNR investigating marble quarries of the Greco-Roman world. He is an official reviewer in several peer-reviewed international journals, and he published more than 50 papers on peer-reviewed international journals on the above-mentioned topics.

Abstract:

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has become the most important physical technique in Earth investigations, allowing the detection of targets with both very high vertical and horizontal resolution, and has been successfully applied in both different fields and aims of the Earth Sciences. The scope of a geophysical measurement is the detection of the “boundaries” between objects having different values of a specific physical property. The contrast between the searched target and the background should be strong enough to be detected “at distance”, i.e. it should be able to generate a measurable relative spatial variation of a physical quantity at surface. GPR technique uses radio waves to create remotely an electromagnetic image of structures and features buried in the ground. The uses of such a remote sensor are numerous: to test the equipment to its maximum potential under a variety of conditions due to construct roving vehicles for landing on Mars; to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the lava flows in an active volcano; to monitor soil water content for agriculture; to find the lines of walls in archaeological excavations; to examine the wall paintings; to assess the structural stability or damages of buildings; and, also, to help law enforcement to solve crime. The “sensitivity” of the electromagnetic waves makes this instrument very powerful in remotely and non-invasively detecting both terrestrial and extraterrestrial targets.

Speaker
Biography:

Luiz Sampaio Athayde Junior Professor of Astronomy Course of Physics Institute (IF/UFBA) of Federal University of Bahia (FCC/UFBA), also Professor and the University Jorge Amado (Unijorge), and has experience as a Tax Analyst. A Master in Business Administration and Extension in Higher Education Methodology by the School of Administration of Federal University of Bahia (EA/UFBA), Post Graduate MBA in Financial Management and Company by Post Graduate and Research Center at Visconde de Cairú (CEPPEV/FVC). Accountant and Degree Bachelor of Accounting Sciences by Estacio University Center of Bahia (Estacio/FIB) and is certified by IAFC First Degree in International Financial Reporting Standards-IFRS.

Abstract:

The seasons occur across the planet because of the inclination of its longitudinal imaginary axis. The translation of the earth shows the four different astronomical positions, which help to define the four seasons, lasting ~ 90 days each. They are set also by weather patterns and the incidence of the sun throughout the year in the tropical zone, it makes the differences become more subtle, damaging its conceptualization in the region. Their differences are more bounded outside the tropics, in the dominant countries, which have created these rules and imposed through literature for northern colonized countries such as ours. The sun towards on Salvador ~ 27/10, far before the official summer, therefore, the city receives its rays back the pin, ~ 15/02, which would date the fall in the official rules. The summer of Salvador should be considered on September 12th, a date prior to the first solar zenith 45 days until April 1, 45 days after the second, because the heat comes before summer officially and lasts much longer, with high temperatures since before Spring official until after the fall, which would justify the modification. The differentiated system of direct sunlight, twice a year between the tropics, highlighting the need for different standards for stations in these localities are, however, it is taught the same rules of the temperate zone. Different companies need different types of education as long as it is taught by the master minds of education, knowledge acquisition is made by the subject's interaction with the environment, and knowledge is built with the approximation of reality by men, therefore, would be more correct to teach rules that are consistent with the observed reality in different localities, especially with the possibility of flowing information, update observation, and the presence of new technologies available for education.

Speaker
Biography:

Victor Ionov graduated from SPb (former Leningrad) State University in 1971. He has completed his PhD in Oceanology at the age of 31 years from St. Petersburg State University and was an exchange researcher at the Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA, for seven months in 1984. He is Assoc. Prof., Department of Oceanology and Director of Division of Baltic and Arctic Projects SPbSU. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and took part in several marine Antarctic Expeditions.

Abstract:

The Southern Ocean contains several oceanic fronts that together form the largest Antarctic Circumpolar Current. The methodology of synoptical monitoring of fronts is based on observations during the seasonal maritime operations for supply of Russian Antarctic stations. It happens by use of continuous registrations of variability of horizontal gradients of temperature of sea surface layer (SSLT) in situ, and horizontal gradients of surface temperature (SST) from satellite infrared (IR) data, which are taken in real-time on board of research vessel. This makes possible more detailed definition of the horizontal gradients of thermic characteristics and latitudinal extent of the fronts zones. It can be done by means of continuous data of SSLT from vessel’s automatic meteorological station, with simultaneous GPS-registration of their spatial location, on the one side; and by precise definition of geographical position of fronts zones of SST from satellite high resolution IR-images of the ocean surface, on the other side. Such data obtained during regular sub-meridional voyages of research-supply vessels between Africa and Antarctica, helps more confident than before to judge about presence/absence of trends in inter-annual changes in the latitudinal location of the main fronts in the Southern Ocean. Such a trends can be considered as an evidence of substantial change of water circulation and as the manifestations of global warming in the Ocean surface layer. During 2009‑2015 tendency in inter-annual shifts of seasonal positions of climatic fronts to the north or south on the surface of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, is not appeared.

Speaker
Biography:

Puzachenko M.Y. has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from Institute of Geography RAS and postdoctoral studies from Institute of Geography RAS. He is the Senior Researcher in Physical geography and Environmental management Department. He has published more than 30 papers in peer reviewed journals and has been a member of more than 15 national and international sciense projects.

Abstract:

Multi and hyperspectral measurements have been suggested as the method of assessment the state of ecosystems. Two approaches are considered: without and with the use of field data. In the first case the calculation of the thermodynamic variables (absorption of solar energy, Kullback information, the entropy of the reflected solar radiation, exergy) of the system, using the solar constant as reference, is used. Types of thermodynamic states of the system are estimated by dichotomous cluster analysis. Such states are usually well associated with known types of vegetation. The same cluster analysis is used on initial measurements of the spectral reflection with selection of the best metrics based on the principle of maximum entropy. This approach allows to differentiate the ecosystem with different forms of solar energy usage and different functioning and also to assess the ecosystems organization. The second approach is based on a regular step measurements along the transects. All points of transect are merged with spatially corresponding thermodynamic and reflectance variables for a different dates of a year. Multidimensional analysis is used to determine the systemic linkages between state of vegetation and soils on the one hand, and thermodynamic and reflectance variables on the other hand. As a results, informativity of remote measurements, its seasonal dynamic and physical basis were obtained, also the factors determining the solar energy usage, and ecosystems maps based on state of ecosystem, which are most connected with the solar energy conversion, were obtained. This study was supported by the RSCF grant 14­27­00065.

Ebrahim Taherzadeh Mobarakeh

Ground Data Solutions R&D Sdn Bhd
Malaysia

Title: Impervious surface detection using very high spatial resolution satellite data

Time : 14:33-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Ebrahim Taherzadeh was born in Isfahan, Iran in 1982. He received his PhD degree on Spatial Information Engineering from University Putra Malaysia in 2014. His PhD thesis was focused on the development of generic models to extract the roof materials using high spatial resolution satellite imagery. Currently he works as Remote Sensing Specialist at Ground Data Solutions R&D Sdn Bhd, a Malaysian LiDAR survey and mapping service provider. His major research effort includes urban remote sensing using high-resolution data, Hyperspectral and LiDAR data. He has published around 10 technical papers in these areas in international conferences and journals.

Abstract:

Satellite remote sensing data is considered as very important source of information and tool for data analysis and visualization. The detection of impervious surface (IS) in heterogeneous urban areas is one of the most challenging tasks in urban remote sensing. With the advent of very high spatial resolution such as Worldview-2(WV2) we are able to utilize high spatial and spectral information which is inherent in this type of image. This presentation investigates how this satellite data is currently being used to better detect and discriminate IS. In this presentation we will present mainly two case studies one on road and another on roof materials. In detail development of spectral index to extract road network automatically and generic model extraction for detection roof materials using WV2 satellite imagery will be discussed and addressed.

Seong Chan Jun

Yonsei University School of Mechanical Eng
Korea

Title: Enhanced chemical vapor sensing by single-stranded DNA-graphene

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Seong Chan JUN has completed Bachelor, master and Ph.D. degree from George Washington University (Washington D.C.), Cornell University (Ithaca N.Y.), and Columbia University (New York, NY) respectively. After he graduated, he worked at NSEC (Nano Scale Science & Research Center) and SAIT (Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology) sequently. He has been currently appointed professor at Yonsei University (Seoul, Korea) since 2008.

Abstract:

Sensor platforms lie at the heart of biochemical sensing applications. The efforts, especially for applying functionalized graphene devices have been recently highlighted in the field of biochemical sensors. However, chemical vapor sensors do not guarantee their sensing ability in high humidity since the electrical measurement is easily degraded by water molecules.

Speaker
Biography:

Dorian Gorgan is Professor in Computer Science Department of the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, PhD supervisor in Computers and Information Technology, and coordinator of the Computer Graphics and Interactive System Laboratory (http://users.utcluj.ro/~gorgan). The fields of interest involve parallel and distributed processing over HPC infrastructures such as Grid, Cloud, Multicore, and cluster, development of platforms and applications for spatial data processing and visualization, interdisciplinary research in the domains of Earth Sciences and Earth Observations. He has been involved as scientific coordinator and WP leader in national and international research projects such as BIGEARTH, PECSA, enviroGRIDS, IASON, SEE-GRID-SCI, GiSHEO, mEducator, iTRACE, MedioGrid, COMPLEXHPC, and KEYSTONE. He has been member of scientific and reviewing committees of many ISI journals and international conferences, and gave more than 300 papers and presentations in journals and prestigious conferences in the domains of Computer Science and Earth Observation.

Abstract:

The main issues of Big Data in Earth Observation (EO) domain are the volume and velocity of data acquired by an increasing number of aerial and space-borne sensors, but as well the complexity of data mining process. The sheer volume and acquisition rates may threaten to overwhelm many organizational storage capabilities, leading to situations in which data value is overtaken by storage costs, which will, in turn, lead to loss of data. Data can create value only when it is used, and the data protection has to be oriented toward allowing innovation that sometimes depends on creative people, which achieve unexpected valuable results through a flexible and adaptive manner. The users need to describe and experiment themselves different complex algorithms through analytics in order to valorize data. The analytics uses descriptive and predictive models to gain valuable knowledge and information from data analysis. This tutorial aims to exemplify some of the main features of WorDeL (Workflow Description Language), and demonstrate their usage in defining Earth Data processing tasks. The WorDeL language is based on the flexible description of processing tasks as workflows, composed of basic processing operators. With this approach, the language offers an intuitive way of representing processing tasks, without requiring programming expertise from its users. It also allows its users to employ and integrate existing functionality into their design, thereby reducing the complexity and development effort of newly defined processing workflows.

Speaker
Biography:

Hamisai Hamandawana is Associate Professor and head of the University of Fort Hare’s Department of GIS & Remote Sensing with research interests in the application of GIS and Remote Sensing to global climate change investigation. He taught GIS, Remote Sensing at the university of Botswana and North West University in South Africa and was GeoInformatics Programme manager for South Africa’s Agricultural Research Council. He has to date conducted several government consultancies, published more than 30 journal papers and reports, presented more than 25 papers at international conferences and served as expert reviewer of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Report.

Abstract:

In 2007 Hamandawana et.al, published a paper in Vol 10 Issue 1 of the International Journal of Remote Sensing which proposed a ground-breaking methodology on how to georeference and mosaic CORONA photographs. These high resolution (2m) panchromatic photographs were acquired by the US military during the Cold War between June 1959 and May 1972 in order to gain military intelligence by spying on the Soviet Union, China and the rest of the world in an undercover surveillance program code-named CORONA. Although CORONA photographs provide one of earliest photoreconnaissance datasets immensely useful for long-term change investigation by extending the temporal coverage of remotely sensed images into the historical past by nearly a decade prior to the launch of Landsat I in 1972, their utility has been constrained by difficulties in compiling large area coverages because they exhibit substantial geometric distortions and exponential brightness variations that are difficult to correct. This presentation will attempt to bridge this gap by sharing with those interested, the first and only available complete CORONA mosaic coverage of the Okavango Delta on 15 September 1967. It is hoped that the remote sensing community will tap on this dataset to provide useful insights on controversies surrounding the transient / non-transient nature of environmental change in this sub-region during the recent historical past.

Speaker
Biography:

Meryem TAHRI was born on November 7, 1988 in Casablanca, actually, she is 3rd year PhD student from university Hassan II Casablanca in discipline of geoscience and environnement. She got the industrial engineering diploma specialized in supply chain and logistics at the age of 24 at ESITH engineering school in Casablanca. she has published a paper in reputed journal. Her speciality is geomatic, decision support system in the environmental ressources and multi-hazard and multi-risk studies supported by EO Data. She participates in a wide range of oral communication and poster presentation. She also started her musical studies at the age of 8, she is actually a professor of piano at the municipal Casablanca conservatory.

Abstract:

The extraction and burning fossil fuels such as coal or petroleum cause the release of carbon dioxide and other global warming pollutants in the atmosphere covering a coat in the planet and puts the earth in danger, several studies recognized the renewable energy resources are as clean sources, governments are already working hard to cut greenhouse gases. Environmental policies are currently largely devoted to fostering the development and implementation of renewable energy technologies in Morocco. This work studies the outcome of combining both Geographic Information System (GIS) tools and the Multi-Criteria Decision-Making (MCDM) method to assess the suitability of a certain set of locations to carry out a renewable energy project. For the sake of concreteness, we consider the case of the Ouarzazate photovoltaic solar energy project, which is located in the southern region of Morocco and aims to be connected to the national power grid of the country. Four criteria were used : location, orography, land use and climate and the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to calculate the corresponding criteria weights. These criteria can be subdivided into seven factors : land use, slope, slope orientation, distance to urban area, distance to road, potential solar radiation and land surface temperature. Climate turns out to be the most important criterion since it defines the potential electricity production of a certain photovoltaic field. Next comes orography, which reveals the steepness or gentleness of the slopes in a particular area. Finally, regarding the location criterion, the most suitable sites are those where the ground is flat and oriented towards the south. The features of a particular area were sorted into five classes:“unsuitable”, “marginally suitable”, “suitable”, “moderately suitable” and “highly suitable”. The outcomes of the study are shown in figure 5. According to our GIS model, a very large proportion of the area, more than 59%, corresponds to highly suitable land for photovoltaic field projects. It is worth mentioning, however, that other lands representing only about 26% were not considered in this assessment, as they are either cultivated or urbanized. As much as 23% of the land is the most suitable and lies in the region of Ghassate in the east whereas the least suitable areas represent 1% and are located in the south and west. In spite of the high potential solar radiation and the land surface temperature, these areas are found in mountainous zones. The overlay layer results obtained after applying spatial analysis showed that the majority of the land in Ouarzazate has a high suitability for photovoltaic farm installation. The high potential solar radiation, the land surface temperature and the orientation towards the south are unsurprisingly the key factors that increase the suitability of a land

Sunil C. Joshi

Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Title: Changing Paradigm in Satellite Design, Development and Assembly with 3D Printing

Time : 18:20-18:40

Speaker
Biography:

Sunil C. Joshi obtained his M.Tech. Degree in Aeronautical Engineering with aircraft structures specialization. He received his Ph.D. degree from Monash University (Australia). Prior to that, he worked as a Scientist at National Aerospace laboratories, Bangalore, India, from 1988 to 1994. He has been an academic staff in School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering since 2000, presently as part of Aerospace Engineering cluster. His expertise lies in the domain of Aerospace Materials and Structures, and his teaching includes courses such as, Advanced Materials Engineering, and Structures and Materials. He has been the chairperson of the accreditation committee that works towards the accreditation of the BEng (AE) programme. He was the member of XSAT, Singapore’s first in-house designed and developed micro-satellite, team where he served as the team leader for thermal controls sub-system. Currently, his work involves nanosats and their thermal and mechanical design and behaviour.

Abstract:

3D printing has evolved with time into a matured process for being able to manufacture functional parts and structures gaining widespread attention in aerospace industry. It has started changing the satellite design philosophy. Designs can now be customized to ease assembly, optimize the space and reduce the overall weight. A design model of a plastic CubeSat structure fabricated employing Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) process is presented. The CubeSat was designed to make assembly easier, possibly by hand, with minimum fasteners. This design ensured that there were no overhanging parts thereby eliminating use of any support material during printing, and it required no surface finishing. Closing or solar panels can be attached to this CubeSat frame without any screws. Essentially this design was easy-to-assemble using only 8 thumb screws in total. Prototypes of the designed CubeSat were printed in ABS to validate the tolerances. The entire sub-systems and payload layout was printed and put together to understand the usage of the available volume. This type of prototyping makes satellite design, development and assembly less complex and easy to visualise. Such designs can potentially be used to 3D print the structure in different environmental or print conditions such as off-world manufacturing.

Speaker
Biography:

Trevor Watkins is an assistant professor at Kent State University, where he serves as subject librarian for Chemistry, Computer Science, Liquid Crystals Institute, Mathematics, Physics, Engineering, Technology, and Military Science in University Libraries. He has over a decade of experience designing, integrating, migrating and deploying systems and networks. His research interests include developing systems using autonomous software agents and bio-inspired algorithms. He sits on the board of CTEST laboratories, where he often voluntarily contributes to the research and development of Epistemological and Hermeneutical systems based in software. He is a professional member of both IEEE, and ACM (SIGAI).

Abstract:

NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) is a network of satellites, antennas, and interplanetary probes. While effective, the current two-way communication link used for probe control and data collection, has some limitations. This paper dicusses how to scale and improve the current Deep Space Network by integrating a new peer-to-peer mesh satellite architecture based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm (ABCA) using autonomous cooperative agents. This paper is divided into three parts. First, the architecture is discussed. It is composed of a new central semantic routing algorithm between satellites, a data forwarding mechanism, and a winter cluster resiliency scheme. Second the interaction, responsibilities, and cooperation between autonomous software agents that govern each satellite is discussed. Finally the integration of this infrastructure with the existing DSN infrastructure is discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

ZhongPing Lee got his Ph.D in 1994 from the University of South Florida. Dr. Lee is currently a Professor at the School For the Environment of the University of Massachusetts Boston. Dr. Lee’s main research interests are in oceanic light field, algorithms for sub-surface properties from measurements of ocean color, as well as applications of ocean color products for the study of aquatic environments. He led the development of the quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) and the Hyperspectral Optimization Processing Exemplar (HOPE) for processing of both optically deep- and shallow- waters.

Abstract:

Secchi disk depth (ZSD), a measurement of the maximum viewable depth of a white or black-and-white disk with a diameter about 30 cm when lowered into water, holds the longest (from at least 1880's) records of water transparency. This ZSD data record is found not only important for the study of climate change, but also useful for seagoers. However, there has been no standard ZSD product from all satellite ocean color missions. This may in part lie in that there was no robust algorithm to estimate ZSD of global oceans from ocean color measurements, although numerous empirical relationships were developed for various locations. In addition, the classical visibility theory suggests that ZSD is proportional to the inverse of (K+c), with K the diffuse attenuation coefficient and c the beam attenuation coefficient. Because c is significantly (2-5 or more) larger than K and that c could not be analytically retrieved from ocean color remote sensing, it has been perceived that there could be no analytical or semi-analytical algorithm for ZSD from ocean color measurements. A recent study found that this classical interpretation of ZSD is flawed, and a new theoretical relationship is developed for ZSD. With concurrent measurements of ZSD and remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) of wide range of aquatic environments, the performance of the estimation of ZSD with Rrs as inputs by the classical and the new approaches is evaluated. The excellent results of the new relationship indicate a robust system to produce global ZSD from satellite ocean color measurements.

Speaker
Biography:

Jium-Ming Lin was born in Taiwan 1952 and graduated from the Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University at Taiwan in 1974. He achieved the Master and Ph. D Degrees from the same school of Institute of Electronics in 1976 and 1985, respectively. He was an adjunct professor and full professor since 1992 and 1996 at the Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chung-Hua University, Taiwan. Now he is at Dept. of Electronic Engineering and majors in the fields of RFID, accelerometer, rate gyro; multi-variable, optimal, stochastic and fuzzy-neural control; avionics, and MEMS. He also has several patents in the related areas.

Abstract:

This research applied both the traditional, Ziegler-Nichols-based and Ziegler-Nichols-based fuzzy control methods for the design of mobile satellite antenna tracking system. Firstly, the antenna tracking and the stabilization loops were roughly designed according to the traditional bandwidth and phase margin requirements. However, the tracking performances would be degraded if the tacking loop gain is reduced due to parameter variations. On the other hand, both Ziegler-Nichols-based PID-type and Ziegler-Nichols-based fuzzy controllers were also applied in the tracking loop to improve the performance. But only the performances obtained by the fuzzy controllers were better for both the antenna tracking loop with low and high gains, and to reduce the effect of tracking loop gain parameter variations. In addition, the backlash hysteresis effect of gimbals are also taken into consideration for both cases; one can see that the systems obtained by using Ziegler-Nichols-based P, PI, PD and PID type fuzzy controllers are more robust to parameter variations even with the hysteresis effect. Key-Words: - Mobile Satellite Antenna, PD-type Fuzzy Controller, PI Compensator, Stabilization