Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Satellite & Space Missions Berlin, Germany.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Capt. Abdullah Al Zahrani photo
Biography:

Abdullah Al Zahrani has completed his bachelor degree in aero science from King Fisal Air Academy “KFAA” as a military pilot at the age of 23 serving around 14 years as a pilot in Royal Saudi Air force. He is the founder and CEO of ALZAHRANI SPACE INNOVATION, part of ALZAHRANI INTERNATIONAL HOLDING GROUP SP.Z.O.O, POLAND. Interested in Physics, Astrophysics and Space Science, research in medicine.

Abstract:

Humans have curious minds. The first successful expedition around the earth was undertaken in the 16th century by Ferdinand Magellan. It took them 3 years and 1 month to return home. Nowadays, we can accomplish it in less than 80 hours. The rapid development of technologies and scientific thinking has opened new horizons for exploring the world around us. The humankind has set its ambition on space exploration. Today the estimated time travel to Mars is around 7 – 9 month. It is determined by the characteristics of Earth and Mars orbits as well as technical features of the modern space shuttles.rnrnIn this speech we would present an innovative approach to think about the space that would introduce how electromagnetic waves can help to speed up the travel to any planet. The idea to use the physical properties of the environment to reduce the energy output for travel is not a new one. Let’s contemplate the possibility of doing this with the space travel. The up-to-date research on warp bubble drive, gravitation waves and electromagnetic energy in space confirms the possibility of such travel. The physical properties of the space shuttle can be accommodated to the outer space in a way that the interaction of both would make the rapid space travel possible.rnrnWith new technologies and innovations we are taking a step forward to fulfilling the dream of conquering the space. Making a dream a reality.

Keynote Forum

Dorian Gorgan

Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Romania

Keynote: Flexible description of Earth observation data processing

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Dorian Gorgan photo
Biography:

Dorian Gorgan is Professor in Computer Science Department of the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, PhD supervisor in Computers and Information Technology, and coordinator of the Computer Graphics and Interactive System Laboratory (http://users.utcluj.ro/~gorgan). The fields of interest involve parallel and distributed processing over HPC infrastructures such as Grid, Cloud, Multicore, and cluster, development of platforms and applications for spatial data processing and visualization, interdisciplinary research in the domains of Earth Sciences and Earth Observations. He has been involved as scientific coordinator and WP leader in national and international research projects such as BIGEARTH, PECSA, enviroGRIDS, IASON, SEE-GRID-SCI, GiSHEO, mEducator, iTRACE, MedioGrid, COMPLEXHPC, and KEYSTONE. He has been member of scientific and reviewing committees of many ISI journals and international conferences, and gave more than 300 papers and presentations in journals and prestigious conferences in the domains of Computer Science and Earth Observation.

Abstract:

Big Data is a challenge in many fields of research, one important domain being those dealing with Earth Observation (EO) data. The main issues, in this case, are the volume and velocity of data acquired by an increasing number of aerial and space-borne sensors, but as well the complexity of data mining process. Thus, the sheer volume and acquisition rates may threaten to overwhelm many organizational storage capabilities, leading to situations in which data value is overtaken by storage costs, which will, in turn, lead to loss of data. Data can create value only when it is used, and the data protection has to be oriented toward allowing innovation that sometimes depends on creative people, which achieve unexpected valuable results through a flexible and adaptive manner. The users need to describe and experiment themselves different complex algorithms through analytics in order to valorize data. The analytics uses descriptive and predictive models to gain valuable knowledge and information from data analysis.rnrnThe BigEarth platform offers solutions for increasing the efficiency of the data processing efforts by combining two approaches. The first one experiments the high-performance, cloud-based computing solution in order to shorten the overall execution time. The second approach provides a highly flexible description of the data processing tasks in order to improve the modularity of the design and promote reusability.rnrnAs a means of specifying the structure of the workflow, the BigEarth platform uses a specially designed description language called WorDeL (Workflow Description Language). This presentation aims to highlight and exemplify some of the main features of the language, and demonstrate their usage in defining Earth Data processing tasks. The WorDeL language is based on the flexible description of processing tasks as workflows, composed of basic processing operators. With this approach, the language offers an intuitive way of representing processing tasks, without requiring programming expertise from its users. It also allows its users to employ and integrate existing functionality into their design, thereby reducing the complexity and development effort of newly defined processing workflows. The WorDeL language supports the transparent adaptive parallelization of the processing tasks over high performance computation architectures, such as cloud based solutions.rn

Keynote Forum

Balwant Rai

Aeronautical Dentistry Kepler Space institute, USA

Keynote: Human long duration space missions: Space dentistry, Medicine and Space policy

Time : 09:55-10:20

OMICS International Satellite 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Balwant Rai photo
Biography:

Assoc. Professor (Dr) Balwant Rai is founder of Aeronautic Dentistry and has written the curriculum and guidelines for the implementation of this new discipline. He is Program Director and Associate Professor of Aeronautic Dentistry at KSU in the USA. He is also the President and Founder of the JBR Institute of Health Education Research and Technology. Dr. Rai has multiple published articles in international and national journals, has written books, and is Editor-in-Chief of different international journals. He is also founder of the BR formula and BR regression equation used in forensic technology. His current work involves the effect of micro-gravity & simulated space analog environment on the oral cavity, human physiology and psychology and non-invasive biomarkers, including the elaboration of technologies to prevent the adverse effects of microgravity on the human physiology and psychology. His biography has been published in different books such as Who’s Who in Health and Medicine and Who’s Who in the World, USA etc. He is invited Editor of Mars Quarterly. He is an invited reviewer to NRF, South Africa, reviewer of more than 10 different journals, and has different pending patents. He is an invited reviewer of many national and international indexed journals. He is consultant of different companies. He was selected as part of Crew 78 on the Mars Desert Research Station [MDRS] as Health and Safety Officer and appointed as Commander for 100 B crew on MDRS. He is principal investigator cum researcher on a project entitled “simulated space mission and human factors including oral cavity: noninvasive technology and herbal formulation”. Dr. Rai is working on a number of space related research projects and is jury member for different space related programs. He has a strong belief in leaving a mark on space programs using non-invasive diagnostic technologies and herbal formulations.

Abstract:

Space agencies have collected lots of scientific data regarding effects of low earth orbits and microgravity on human body health. Prolonged human space missions will face other additional problems, some still unanswered issues such as effects of different factors ( radiation levels, local environments including atmospheres, dust, gravity, day-night cycles, isolation) on human body. The presentation scrutinizes the major issues of oral and medical health (Space dentistry and space medicine) based on JBR simulated space mission as well as to discuss space policy for planning the future exploration of space.

  • Track 01: Space Missions | Track 03: Space exploration | Track 04: Earthquake Engineering | Track 07: Types of Satellites and Applications | Track 10: Aerospace Engineering and Technology | Track 11: Applications of Satellite Technology | Track 13: Climate change and Weather forecasting
Speaker

Chair

Dorian Gorgan

Technical University of Cluj-Napoca
Romania

Speaker

Co-Chair

Joseph Seckbach

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Israel

Session Introduction

Mark A. Skinner

The Boeing Company
USA

Title: Current issues in Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Traffic Management (STM)

Time : 10:35-10:55

Speaker
Biography:

Skinner joined Boeing in 1999 (Maui Space Surveillance System). In 2015 he transitioned to Boeing Research & Technology (Albuquerque NM) as a senior scientist and technical manager. Skinner specializes in space object characterization; his current research focus is orbital debris, with an emphasis on debris in GEO. He is currently PM of Boeing’s Commercial ground-based SSA team, supporting Boeing's commercial satellite customers.

Abstract:

The geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite belt is a unique location above the earth affording a continuous line-of-sight to satellite uplink and downlink stations. The volume defined by this belt is large, but available slots are limited. During the last fifty years of the space age, this volume has become more crowded, as humankind has launched more and more satellites into this particular orbital regime, and satellites that suffered incapacitating anomalies and space debris have remained in the belt. The latter pose a hazard since they are uncontrolled, and the only way for satellite operators to avoid collisions with space objects is to maneuver. Knowing when and where to maneuver requires space situational awareness (SSA), but this is just one aspect needed to maintain safety of flight in this very valuable orbital regime. For national and international regulatory agencies, SSA is the key to being able to initiate space traffic management (STM). This paper reports on, from the point of view of an SSA practitioner, what the current key issues and dangers are for SSA and STM, and what the best possible set of near-term actions could be, involving international cooperation (through bodies such as the UN COPUOS), data sharing between actors in the space arena, public and private sector SSA efforts, and nascent research efforts into active space debris removal. Where limited available resources should be applied to affect the best possible outcome for the sustainable use of space?

Balwant Rai

Aeronautical Dentistry Kepler Space institute
USA

Title: Space simulated missions and space research: Human health

Time : 10:55-11:15

Speaker
Biography:

Balwant Rai is founder of Aeronautic Dentistry and has written the curriculum and guidelines for the implementation of this new discipline. He is Program Director and Associate Professor of Aeronautic Dentistry at KSU in the USA. He is also the President and Founder of the JBR Institute of Health Education Research and Technology. Dr Rai has multiple published articles in international and national journals, has written books, and is Editor-in-Chief of different international journals. He is also founder of the BR formula and BR regression equation used in forensic technology. His current work involves the effect of micro-gravity & simulated space analog environment on the oral cavity, human physiology and psychology and non-invasive biomarkers, including the elaboration of technologies to prevent the adverse effects of microgravity on the human physiology and psychology. His biography has been published in different books such as Who’s Who in Health and Medicine and Who’s Who in the World, USA etc. He is invited Editor of Mars Quarterly. He is an invited reviewer to NRF, South Africa, reviewer of more than 10 different journals, and has different pending patents. He is an invited reviewer of many national and international indexed journals. He is consultant of different companies. He was selected as part of Crew 78 on the Mars Desert Research Station [MDRS] as Health and Safety Officer and appointed as Commander for 100 B crew on MDRS. He is principal investigator cum researcher on a project entitled “simulated space mission and human factors including oral cavity: noninvasive technology and herbal formulation”. Dr Rai is working on a number of space related research projects and is jury member for different space related programs. He has a strong belief in leaving a mark on space programs using non-invasive diagnostic technologies and herbal formulations.

Abstract:

Simulated space missions are very special environments for doing researches and testing new techniques related to human health which are beneficial to space and on Earth. Simulated space environments are providing best understanding of different aspects of human physiology including oral cavity, sociology and psychology which helps in developing and inventing novel protocols and technologies for monitoring the astronaut’s health. In this key note address, I will discuss our inventions and technologies related to human health in space simulated missions.

Yüksel Altiner

Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy in Frankfurt am Main
Germany

Title: Geodetic earthquake forecasting and crustal deformation modeling from point position changes using GPS data

Time : 11:15-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Yüksel Altiner has earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the Yildiz Technical University of Istanbul and Master and Doctoral degrees from the University of Bonn. In 1997, he was named a University Docent in Geodesy by the Turkish Interuniversity Committee. He developed an Analytical Surface Deformation Theory, which was published in a book in 1999 and later translated from English into Chinese. Since 1989, he has worked in the Geodesy Division of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

Abstract:

We can consider that the Earth is a body represented by single points; energy stored or released due to geotectonic processes then engenders pre-seismic elastic strain and periodic co-seismic waves that shake the ground and change the positions of these points. Point position changes within the CORS-TR network were determined to study pre-seismic, co-seismic, and post-seismic motions of the 23 October 2011 Van, Turkey earthquake applying a variety of processing methods on GPS data. Observed co-seismic surface deformations at the CORS-TR stations were then modelled using a theoretical earthquake source model independent of the seismic observations. This presentation focuses on, from a geodetical point of view, the set of point position changes needed to forecast earthquakes and also discusses Earth’s crustal deformations, as described by the outcomes of the analysis. To emphasize the three dimensional nature of Earth’s crust deformations, this presentation will discuss the proposed investigation of a possible tectonic (plate) boundary in the Adriatic Sea that crosses from Gargona, Italy to Sibenik/Zadar, Croatia. To do so, we will apply analytical surface deformation theory to the annual movements of ground stations in a large geodynamic network along the edges of the Adriatic Sea.

Sunil C Joshi

Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Title: Characteristics of hypervelocity impact of Micro-particles on multi-foils shield configurations

Time : 11:35-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Sunil C. Joshi obtained his Ph.D. from Monash University (Australia) and has been a faculty in School of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering since 2000. His expertise lies in the domain of Aerospace Materials and Structures, especially advanced composites and novel material systems. Dr. Joshi was a member of XSAT, Singapore’s first in-house designed and developed micro-satellites, team, where he served as the team leader for thermal controls sub-system. Besides currently being an Assistant Chair for Graduate Studies, he also chairs School's Aerospace Engineering (AE) accreditation committee that prepares towards accreditation of the BEng (AE) programme.

Abstract:

Numerical investigation is carried out to assess performance of multiple foils shield configurations against hypervelocity micro-particle impact. Micro particle material mainly consists of three materials, namely aluminum, float glass and steel. Further the shield configuration is modelled by aluminum in first bumper foil and Ti-6Al-4V in the second foil. The modeled impact scenario has consistent dimensions in every simulation with the micro-particle diameter, first foil thickness and second foil thickness measuring 47μm, 8μm, 15μm respectively. Numerical investigation of the shield configuration was performed using smooth particle hydrodynamic processor in AUTODYN hydrocodes and material modeling was accomplished using an equation of state with constitutive strength and cumulative damage model. The numerical results accurately depict the DC generation, kinematic and geometrical parameters of the DC, micro-particle condition, and standoff foil condition after the impact. Studies have shown that a two foil shield configuration is capable of restraining micro-particles with mechanical strength similar to float glass and aluminum. Additionally a 1-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V plate has to be added into the shield configuration at 5 mm distance from the second foil to resist the impact of rigid (steel) micro-particles.

Speaker
Biography:

Stanislav I Klimov Born on 27 June 1937 in Tula region, Russia. Head of Laboratory for Electro - Magnetic Emissions Investigation, Department of Space Plasma Physics, Space Research Institute (IKI), Russian Academy of Sciences. S. Klimov graduated from Department of Physics, Moscow State University (1966), received Ph.D. of physics-mathematics in 1984, Doctor of Scinces of physics-mathematics in 1994. Now he is the Scientific Manager of ASPI experiment INTERBALL TAIL PROBE and APW-R Relict-2 wave and field experiments and WEC Cluster wave experiment Co-I. The laboratory he leads also includes the electrostatic and magnetic cleanliness and EMC group. Now this group use the experience from the previous projects for the study of the electro-magnetic enviromnent of the MIR orbital station and in the future experiments of the International Space Station. He has more than 100 publications. His research interest includes: Waves in solar wind /magnetospheres and comet plasma interactions, magnetospheric convection and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, interaction of the supper large bodies (orbital station) with ionosphere.

Abstract:

JSC "RSC "Energia" and SRI RAS as part of the "Long-term program of scientific-applied researches and experiments on the ISS RS", in accordance with the decision of the Coordinating Scientific and Technical Council (KNTS) of the Federal Space Agency for programs of scientific and applied research and experiments on manned space complexes, the first in the world implemented the "dual-launch" with transport cargo vehicle (TGC) the "Progress" and the ISS RS. In accordance with this technology the microsatellites composed of other TGC goods are delivered to the ISS RS, and then after performing the TGC primary function for the delivery of goods, is re-starting the engines of the "Progress" and he brings the microsatellite to a higher orbit (500 km). This scheme increases the economic efficiency of associated output for the TGC microsatellites weighing up to 100 kg and increases the ballistic time of their existence no less than 5 times. The introduction of this technology opens up wide prospects for fundamental space research and the Russian universities the possibility of launching their own satellites for scientific and educational purposes. The paper presents the experience of implementing this technology at the launch of the scientific micro-satellite "Chibis-M" (mass 40 kg), established the Russian Academy of Sciences to conduct a comprehensive space experiment (SE) on the study of energy of high-altitude lightning discharges in a wide range of electromagnetic radiation. At present in IKI in preparation are similar to the tasks of the SE on the microsatellite "Chibis-AI" and "Trabant" (2019-2021), included in the Program of scientific and applied research on the ISS RS.

Speaker
Biography:

Daniel Casanova Ortega completed his PhD in 2013 from University of Zaragoza (Spain) and Post-doctoral studies from University of Namur (Belgium). His main fields of interest on Astrodynamics are Satellite Constellations and Space Debris. He is an Assistant Professor at the University Center of Defense, affiliated with the University of Zaragoza (Spain). He has published more than 10 scientific papers. He is an active researcher in several R+D projects.

Abstract:

Space debris has become a real problem in the last decades. The quantity of space debris fragments orbiting the Earth with no control has increased exponentially. The risk of collision between spacecraft and space debris larger than 10 cm is avoided by spacecraft maneuvering. However, collision with small space debris fragments is impossible to avoid causing important damages to spacecraft. Consequently, different space debris propagation methods are required, not only to know the fragments precise position but also the statistical evolution of the space debris clouds. For this purpose, in collaboration with Prof. Anne Lemaitre and Alexis Petit from the University of Namur, an analytical method for propagating space debris in the geostationary ring considering different perturbations such as the J2 effect due to the Earth oblateness, the solar radiation pressure, or the Sun and Moon perturbations as third bodies have been developed. The Hamiltonian formulation of the problem and the use of different averaging technics have allowed the development of a powerful analytical method. The analytical model has been validated with numerical tests through different examples to confirm the reliability and accuracy of our method. The inclination period has also been analyzed as a function of the area to mass ratio. The final idea of this work is to apply this method to propagate a synthetic population of space debris.

Massimo Materassi

Institute for Complex Systems of the National Research Council
Italy

Title: Dealing with the Earth’s ionosphere’s complexity

Time : 12:35-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Massimo Materassi has completed his PhD at the age of 30 years from Perugia University and postdoctoral studies from Space Research Centre in Warsaw. He is the Italian Representative in the Commission G “Ionospheric Radio and Propagation” of the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a referee in different journals. His research is about both applied Physics (ionospheric physics and space weather, ecological models) and pure Physics (fundaments of dissipation).

Abstract:

The Earth’s ionosphere is a composite system of several charged chemicals, both ions and electrons, dynamically conditioned by the important ionizing factors determining its existence, and by the forces exerted on them: in particular, the solar UV radiation (main ionizing factor) and the forces due to the geomagnetic field, gravity and the massive neutral matter containing them. Hence, ionospheric time and space variability is essentially driven by the concurrence of all these forcing factors, imprinting ionosphere’s tempos with their ones. The characteristic times of the Sun-Earth relative kinematics and geometry are recognizable in the ionospheric variability, but these forcing factors do not just superimpose, and give rather rise to a complicated non-linear composition of causes into ionospheric effects. This non-linear composition results in a complex behavior both in terms of space structures and time evolution: indeed, on the one hand large scale ionospheric patterns evolve on a quasi-periodic basis, as those systems following strange trajectories in their phase space; on the other hand, local ionospheric proxies (fields, velocities and densities) are irregular, resembling rather turbulent signals than smooth profiles. In few words, this all is ionospheric complexity. Ionospheric complexity must be deal with in modeling ionospheric effects on positioning, navigation, telecommunication. In this talk, aspects of ionospheric modeling centered on taking into account complexity will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Oleg Troshichev graduated from Leningrad University, USSR. He has completed his PhD in physics at the Siberian Institute of Earth Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radiowave Propagation (SibIZMIR, Irkutsk, 1969). He takes charge of Department of Geophysics in AARI from 1985. The main subject of his investigations is physics of the Earth’s magnetosphere and solar-terrestrial relations. Prof. Oleg Troshichev is author of the polar cap magnetic activity (PC) index that has been endorsed by the IAGA (2013) as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere. He has published more than 250 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The space weather monitoring basically rests on of the solar wind measurements outside of the magnetosphere. The ground-based index of the polar cap magnetic activity (PC) is regarded as index characterizing the energy that entered into the magnetosphere. The following relationships between the PC-index and the solar wind parameters, on the one hand, and relations between the PC evolution and the magnetospheric substorms (AL index) and magnetic storms (Dst index) development, on the other hand, provide this concept: (1) the PC index is perfectly correlates with the interplanetary electric field (EKL), (2) delay time ΔT in response of PC index to EKL variations is controlled by the EKL field growth rate (dEKL/dt) and does not depend on such solar wind parameters, as solar wind speed VX and IMF BZ component, (3) magnetic storms and substorms are always preceded and accompanied by РС index growth, (4) substorms and magnetic storms start to develop as soon as the PC index steadily exceeds the threshold level of 1.5 mV/m, (5) the substorm sudden onsets are commonly associated with a sharp increase in the PC (and EKL) growth rate, (6) linear correlation between the PC and AL values is typical for all classes of the substorms, (7) maximal depression of magnetic field responds to maximal PC value with a delay of ~1 hour, the storm intensity (Dstmin) being linearly depending on PCmax value. The PC index can be used as a reliable ground-based means for exploration of short-term changes in space weather and magnetosphere state.

Chan Kheong Sann

Data Storage Institute (DSI)
Singapore

Title: Joint Viterbi Detector/Decoder for satellite communications

Time : 13:55-14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Chan Kheong Sann obtained his bachelor's degree from Northwestern University, Illinois and his PhD from National University of Singapore in Electrical Engineering. He has been working at the Data Storage Institute, a Singapore government A*STAR reearch institute for 16 years and is currently the leader of the coding and signal processing team. One of the projects he is currently leading is an NRF funded project from the Singapore government investigating the JVDD for satellite communications.

Abstract:

Satellite broadband communication today uses the DVB-S2 second generation standard proposed and developed through the DVB consortium project in 2003. The DVB-S2 standard uses a combination of a forward error correction (FEC) with multiple code rates, and multiple modulation modes giving a range of spectrum efficiencies ranging from 0.5 to 4.5 bits per transmitted symbol. The FEC scheme used is a combination of BCH and LDPC codes with combined code rates of ¼, 1/3, 2/5, ½, 3/5, 2/3, ¾, 4/5, 5/6, 8/9 and 9/10. The modulation schemes on the other hand could be one of QPSK, 8PSK, 16APSK or 32APSK for each frame. The Joint Viterbi Detector/Decoder (JVDD) is a recently proposed scheme that performs detection and decoding jointly over an encoded ISI base-band channel, and is a competitor to the LDPC decoder operating over the same channel. Alternatively, the ISI channel can be replaced by a modulation scheme that does encoding and modulation prior to the transmission, as in the case of the DVB-S2 standard. This makes the JVDD a candidate for replacing the demodulator and decoder in a DVB-S2 receiver. Previous work over an AWGN/ISI channel has seen the JVDD outperforming the LDPC decoder at shorter codeword lengths. In this work we present simulation results benchmarking the JVDD against the LDPC iterative decoding scheme at the range of code rates and modulation schemes used in the DVB-S2 standard.

Joseph Seckbach

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Israel

Title: From extremophilic microbes to extraterrestrial possibilities of life

Time : 14:15-14:35

Speaker
Biography:

Joseph Seckbach is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Cellular Origins, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology Seroes. He earned his PhD from University of Chicago and did a Post-doctorate at Caltech, then headed a group at UCLA studying extraterrestrial life possibilities. Later, he was appointed to the Hebrew University and spent sabbaticals at UCLA and Harvard. During 1997-98, he served at LSU, Baton Rouge, as the first selected Chair for the Louisiana Sea Grant. He published ~140 scientific articles including Hebrew-language Chemistry Lexicon. His interest is over enigmatic microorganisms, life in extreme environments and astrobiology. He has given seminars at numerous universities.

Abstract:

We know life all over in ‘normal’ environments with mild habitable conditions. However, there are also habitats on Earth that have very severe environmental conditions that host microorganisms. The organisms living and thriving in these harsh conditions are termed Extremophiles. While these environments are considered harsh and severe environments from our anthropocentric point of view, the extremophiles consider their environment as a Garden of Eden. Most of them are not able to live in ‘normal’ environments, which are toxic for them. Among the organisms in these harsh habitats, one can find prokaryotes such as Cyanobacteria and eukaryotes such as algal species and even micro-animals (such as Tardigrates). If extremophiles tolerate more than one extreme factor, we call them Polyextremophiles. Among these extreme conditions are high salt media (halophiles), high levels of temperatures (thermophiles or hyperthermophiles) or very low temperatures (psychrophilic, hyperthermophiles), and various pH levels (in the low pH range are the acidophilic; in high levels – alkalophilic). The extremophiles and polyextremophiles could serve as analogues or models for astrobiology. We are aware that the planet Mars contains liquid water, and several satellites have in their subsurface (icy layers) an ocean of salty liquid water. There are plans to send a human mission to Mars around the year 2030 and have it return with some extraterrestrial samples which would inform our view on the possibilities of external life (as “we know it”).

Oyvind G Gron

Oslo and Akershus University
Norway

Title: How to talk about Einstein’s general theory of relativity?

Time : 14:35-14:55

Speaker
Biography:

Oyvind G Gron is a Norwegian Physicist. He took the Cand. Real. Degree at the University of Oslo in 1973, majoring in Meteorology. He followed up with Dr. Philos. Degree in 1990 with a thesis on Repulsive Gravitation. He was appointed as a Professor at Oslo University College in 1994. He has also been Professor II at the University of Oslo since 1994. He has conducted research within the areas of general relativity, cosmology and classical electromagnetism. He has thrown new light on themes like the twin paradox, the physics in a rotating reference system and repulsive gravitation associated with vacuum energy. Together with Erik Eriksen at the University of Oslo, he has also studied properties of the electromagnetic field produced by accelerated electric charges. They have in particular shown how gravitation modifies such fields. He has also found new solutions to equations in Einstein's theory of gravity that describe time space where one can travel backwards in time. In several studies, he has focused on relativistic models of the universe. He has, among other things, shown that it is possible to interpret observations from cosmos so that the concept of dark energy is unnecessary. The relationship between gravitation and time and between gravitation and entropy are also themes where he has contributed several journal articles. He has 153 research articles, and has written 3 books on the theory of relativity published by Springer.

Abstract:

I will here review the main conceptual contents of the theory of relativity in a non-mathematical way as far as possible. We start by the principle of equivalence and then go on to discuss the possibility of extending the principle of relativity to accelerated and particularly rotating motion. The significance of the phenomenon of inertial dragging in this connection is pointed out. Then we discuss whether there is any connection between experiencing acceleration of gravity and the curvature of space time. The next topic is how to obtain a proper understanding of the strange property of a classical black hole that nothing can come out of it. We point out the significance of the so called “river of space” in this connection. Finally we discuss the phenomenon of repulsive gravitation and the difference between Einstein’s interpretation of the cosmological constant and it modern interpretation.

Speaker
Biography:

Porzia Federica Maffione completed her Master’s degree in Mechatronic Engineering from Polytechnic of Turin. Her project thesis was on space propulsion for human spaceflight with VASIMR and the aim of this project was to study the optimization problem with indirect method. Currently, she is doing PhD at Polytechnic of Turin and her research is about interplanetary missions design for NEP and SEP. Her first publications are on optimal low-thrust trajectories.

Abstract:

Interplanetary missions are strictly dependent on the launch opportunity. Mission planning requires a knowledge not only of the technological and cost constraints but also the study of the influence of the launch opportunity on the spacecraft performance and on the feasibility of the mission itself. Porkchop plots are very effective tools to design an interplanetary mission, providing a graphical and optimized overview of the relationship between the fundamental parameters of the mission design: the launch date, the duration and the energy. In this way it is possible to evaluate the best region to accomplish the mission under current constraints. Porkchop plots in their usual implementation are, however, applicable only to impulsive (chemical or NTP) propulsion. In this paper an interplanetary mission from Earth to Mars is analyzed, comparing plots similar to porkchop plots, but obtained for low thrust, NEP and SEP. As a first approximation, the orbits of the two planets are considered as coplanar and circular. Then, using the ephemerides, elliptical and non coplanar orbits are taken into account and the “ideal” plots are compared with the actual ones, referred to a particular launch opportunity. Finally, some numerical examples are carried out.

Speaker
Biography:

Moisés Meza Pariona is an Associate Professor in the Department of materials engineering at State University of Ponta Grossa, Brazil. He is the supervisor of undergraduate students and master's degrees. His eduactional deatils are: Degree in physics, Master, doctorate and post doctorate in engineering and materials science. Work in research recast aluminum alloys with laser, characterized by different techniques: optical microscopy, SEM, micro hardness, x-rays, atomic force, corrosion and electrochemical impedance, etc. Finite element simulation of casting and solidification process of alloys. Several projects with various universities. He has published several research articles in national and international Journals.

Abstract:

In this research we carried out a study of the corrosion of Al–2.0 wt. %Fe alloy treated by laser surface remelting (LSR) and was compared with untreated samples (substrate). In this research LSR without protective coating with a 2 kW Yb-fiber laser (IPG YLR- 2000S) was used. Therefore, corrosion potential testing, micro and macro polarization, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed. The morphological and chemical characterizations of the base material (substrate) and of the material treated by LSR were made using a scanning electron microscope and optical microscopy. The results showed that the laser surface treatment effected the Al–2.0 wt. %Fe alloy leads to the formation of a structure with more compact, homogeneous and fine microstructure. Furthermore, with increased surface hardness, roughness reduction, corrosion rates was approximately 10 times smaller when compared with the untreated alloy in the aerated media 25ºC and solution of H2SO4 0.1 mol/L The resistance polarization measures the charge transfer at the interface electrode/solution and similar results were found in both experiments carried out by the techniques polarization curves which involves determining the Tafel constant and by the EIE technique, and the treated sample by LSR showed about 11 times greater than the untreated material. By the electrochemical impedance technique was possible to evaluate the oxide layer formed on the surface of Al–2.0 wt. %Fe alloy treated by LSR, as a protective film against corrosion of this alloy treated by LSR in the middle of H2SO4 0.1 mol/L compared with not treated alloy. In equilibrium conditions the sampled treated showed high capacitive effect in relation to the untreated sample at higher frequencies. In both samples also presented the inductive effect at low frequencies and it is much more noticeable in the treated sample that the untreated sample.

Alberto Gallina

AGH University of Science and Technology
Poland

Title: Analysis of (soft) soil parameter uncertainty in planetary rover mobility simulations

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Alberto Gallina has completed his PhD from AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow where he is currently Assistant Professor and teaching subjects like Mechanics and Uncertainty Analysis. He took part in several research projects on the same topics. He had been a 15-month guest scientist in the DLR – Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics where he joined the ExoMars project. He is author of 10 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

A crucial aspect in planetary exploration is connected with the mobility of planetary rovers on sandy terrain largely present on the Moon and Mars surface. Travelling on soft terrain rovers may experience very high sinkage, which significantly reduces vehicle mobility. In order to reduce the risk of burying a rover’s wheel into a sandy terrain, extensive experimental and numerical analyses have been conducted. Several simulation frameworks for predicting the rover behavior on soft terrain through dedicated computer models have also been developed by research institutes. In this context, semi-empirical formulations of wheel-soil contact models based on the so called Bekker-theory have been advocated. They ensure a good compromise between model accuracy and simulation time. However, Bekker-based contact models need the estimate of a set of terrain parameters by dedicated laboratory tests. But large uncertainty always affects the soil parameters identification step. It mainly appears as the impossibility to exactly reproduce under laboratory conditions of the soil where the rover travels on. This lack of knowledge may strongly limit the rover behavior prediction capabilities of computer models. In this work different numerical frameworks are presented for uncertainty treatment in wheel-soil contact models based on Bekker’s theory. Polynomial chaos, fuzzy method and Bayesian approach are employed to propagate soil parameter uncertainty through the model for assessing possible predicted rover paths. Results from the analysis is presented and extensively commented.

Speaker
Biography:

Erwin De Donder has completed his PhD in Astrophysics within the field of close binary star evolution and galactic chemical evolution. Currently working as scientist at the Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy within the Space Weather section. Profound experience in developing services related to space radiation and effects on spacecraft’s (e.g. SPENVIS). Responsible for the end-user strategy within the frame of the current development of ESA’s Space Situational Awareness Space Weather Service Network.

Abstract:

Spacecraft operations are by nature complex and every satellite's operational environment poses a range of potential risks, often a unique combination for a given orbit. The implications of interruptions of operations, data transfer and service provision, are serious, both in terms of cost and capability, thus it is imperative to mitigate against all operational risks to the fullest possible extent. In the frame of its Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme, the European Space Agency (ESA) is establishing a Space Weather Service Network to support end-users, in a wide range of affected sectors, in mitigating the effects of space weather on their systems, reducing costs and improving reliability. This service network is currently in a test and validation phase and encourages user engagement and feedback. Currently, the network is organised around five Expert Service Centers (ESCs) focusing on Solar Weather, Heliospheric Weather, Space Radiation Environment, Ionospheric Weather and Geomagnetic Conditions. Each ESC is connecting different expert groups, federating their space weather products, and ensuring the quality and consistency of the provided information. The service network also includes a central Data Centre and the SSA Space weather Coordination Centre (SSCC). In this presentation we give an overview of the current status of the network (http://swe.ssa.esa.int/), the targeted end-user groups and Expert Service Centers with a focus on the user domain of spacecraft operators. We are also keen to gather feedback and requirements from end-users in order to improve the network support capabilities and to tailor its services.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohamed Mhmod is a PHD student and going to completed his PhD in june 2016 from Jilin University, China. He has published 4 papers in reputed journals. His international experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study.

Abstract:

In recent years, remote sensing and geographic information systems and other technology rapid development and wide application of Land has become an effective means of status and temporal evolution of the process, providing a dynamic information environment is difficult to obtain conventional methods to solve complex spatial problems for the conduct of regional dynamic monitoring provides favorable conditions. The satellite images were used from 1974-1976 land sat-1,2, 1989-1996 land sat-4,1999-2005 land sat -7, Google earth images 2005-2008 during period of time for this study , Geomorphic features are extracted from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM data 2002 and 2010, SRTM DEM and Land sat data were used to extract the geo morphometric Features and structures. The relationship between the topography and tectonics is assessed to understand the evolution mode.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor, DSc Alexander M. Krot is a Head of the Laboratory of Self-Organization System Modeling at the United Institute of Informatics Problems of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. He graduated from the Belarusian State University, Department of Radiophysics in 1982. He received PhD in 1985, then degree of Doctor of Sciences (DSc) in 1991 and Professor degree in 1997. He has published 275 scientific works including 3 monographs and more than 60 articles in refereed journals.

Abstract:

This work investigates the stability and forms of planetary orbits in exoplanetary systems based on a statistical theory of forming cosmogonical bodies. We show that knowledge of some orbital characteristics of multi-planet extrasolar systems refines the knowledge of the parameters of the stars based on the combined Kepler’s 3rd law with universal stellar law (3KL-USL). The proposed 3KL-USL predicts statistical oscillations of circular motion of planets around stars. This work applies the statistical theory of forming cosmogonical bodies based on model of gravitating spheroidal body to explore forms of planetary orbits with regard to Alfvén–Arrhenius’ oscillating forces in the Solar system as well as other exoplanetary systems. Unlike the traditional approaches we show that due to the Alfvén–Arrhenius’ oscillating force mainly the bodies moving in a remote zone of a spheroidal body have elliptic and inclined trajectories. We explain an origin of Alfvén–Arrhenius’ radial and axial oscillations modifying forms of planetary orbits within the framework of the statistical theory of forming cosmogonical bodies. We find that temporal deviation of the gravitational compression function of a spherically symmetric spheroidal body (under the condition of mechanical quasiequilibrium) induces an additional periodic force. In turn, as shown here if the additional periodic force becomes counterbalance to the gravitational force then the principle of an anchoring mechanism is realized in exoplanetary systems, i.e. the stability of planetary orbits occurs. We also note that the spatial deviation of the gravitational potential of a rotating spheroidal body from a spherically symmetric one implies a difference in the values of the radial and the axial orbital oscillations (even in the case of its mechanical equilibrium), therefore the interference of these orbital oscillations can lead to the nonuniform rotation of stellar layers at different latitudes of star.

Sathish Ayyappa

University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore
India

Title: Geospatial approaches for micro level farm planning - A step to enhance crop productivity

Time : 17:25-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Sathish Ayyappa has completed his PhD from University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru, India by securing University Gold Medal. He is presently working as Soil Physicist at All India Co-ordinated Research Project for Dryland Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru in India. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals. He is the recipient of Vasant Rao Naik National award for best Dryland Research in India during 2014-15. He is guiding students in Master’s degree programme in Soil Science at the University. He is also working in two international projects.

Abstract:

Soil and water are the most important natural resource required for crop production. Its inventory, characterization, and suitability assessment for crops is essential for conserving these natural resources and enhance crop productivity. An attempt is made to provide micro level farm planning at 1:10,000 scale using geospatial approaches in Honnenahalli micro- watershed located at 75o 54’ 54.24’’ East longitude and 14o 35’ 96’’ North latitude in Karnataka, India. The detailed land resource inventory facilitated is arriving at 29 management units in 963 hectares of micro watershed. The fertility status was also assessed using standard procedures for estimation of nutrients. Soil and water resource were assessed and mapped using Remote Sensing, GPS and GIS techniques. Land suitability for major crops (Maize, paddy, Custard apple, Lime, etc) was assessed and land capability classification was worked out. The final management plan in terms of soil and water conservation measures (contour bunding, conservation furrow, inter bund management, farm pond, etc.), soil health management (suitable amendments for soil amelioration, fertilizer recommendation for crops based on soil test results) and crop planning (crops and suitable cropping systems with varieties for agriculture, horticulture and forest component and sowing time) was provided for micro level planning by the implementing agency. The adoption of management plan would enable in changing crops and cropping system based on scientific data and enhances agricultural productivity and livelihood security.

Yasser A. Abdel-Hadi

National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG)
Egypt

Title: Space-Based Solar Laser System Simulation to Transfer Power onto the Earth

Time : 17:45-18:05

Speaker
Biography:

Yasser A. Abdel-Hadi has completed his Ph.D. in 2005 from the Technical University of Berlin, Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics. He is an Associate Professor and staff member at the Solar and Space Research Department of the National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics (NRIAG). He has published more than 38 papers in reputed journals and has been organized many conferences and workshops in Egypt and Germany.

Abstract:

A simulation model of a space-based solar laser system to transfer the power onto the earth is carried out. The system consists of a solar pumped laser by a concentration system set on a satellite. The resulted laser is directed onto the earth surface, where it can be used to generate power. The intensity and the divergence of the laser are calculated in order to obtain the optimal solar laser system as a payload on the satellite and the optimal terrestrial applications in Egypt.

Speaker
Biography:

Hongfei Wang is currently working at Technology and Engineering Center for Space Utilization, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. He is awarded PhD from Chinese Academy of Sciences, China in the year 2008-2012. His area of interests includes Aerospace ground systems, intelligent mission planning, Telescience.

Abstract:

China's Space Station will be launched at year 2018; this space station is China's largest space science experiment and application platform until now. It will stay in space orbit more than a decade and have many complex scientific space experimental tasks to do step by step in the future. This would mean that we are facing many challenges for our Payload Operation and application system, including complex mission planning, high-speed mass data processing, health management, payload status monitoring, remote support for teleScience and the ground system dynamically updates with the scientific mission changes all the time. This paper mainly introduces the composition of hardware architecture, design of the system architecture and the new technology we use to implement the payload operation and application ground system of China's Space Station Keyword: Human Spaceflight, China's Space Station, Ground Operations System, TeleScience

Speaker
Biography:

Muhammad Shakir has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years fro University of Chinese academy of sciences. He is working as professor in university of Peshawar. He has published more than 13 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of some of the reputed journals.

Abstract:

Most methods used large quantity of field data of the same reference year for crops classification which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this study we explored the optical application of time series MODIS EVI with adjacent years of ground reference data for classifying major crops on a regional level in US state of Kansas. Time series MODIS EVI data have been obtained between 2008 and 2013. Ground reference data (2008–2013) of the major crops (winter wheat, corn, soybeans, sorghum and alfalfa) in Kansas were acquired from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A machine learning algorithm namely Antibody Network (ABNet) classifier was used to classify the major crops. The ABNet was trained using five years of ground reference data and verified by ground reference data of the other year. For instance, to classify major crops in 2008, ground reference data of (2009–2013) were used as training samples and the data of that year (i.e. 2008) were used as validation. The results evince the classification accuracy in a range from 74.4 to 81.9% and kappa coefficient of 0.6–0.8 respectively. This method can improve remote sensing imagery in the process of classification and can help to alleviate the heavy load of field data in areas where ground data are unavailable.

Speaker
Biography:

Giora Shaviv is an Emeritus Professor at the Israel Institute of technology, Haifa, Israel. He held the Shwartzmann-Medvedi cjair in space sciences. He obtained his B.Sc. In 1959 from the Technion (summa cum laude), his M.Sc. in 1960 (summa cum laude), and Ph.D. in 1965 with thesis subject: fast reactor physics. He has been physics and astronomy department chair in Tel Aviv University, Dean of physics at technion, head of the Asher space research institute. Shaviv served as Vice President and President of the Israel physical Society. Shaviv was elected to the International Academy of Astronautics. His fields of interests are theoretical astrophysics, fundamental process in astrophysics, planetary atmosphere and the greenhouse effect. Shaviv published over 250 papers in the international professional literature and three popular books in Hebrew and two professional books in English.

Abstract:

High level of stellar UV radiation on a planet’s surface may prevent planet’s habitability and limit the width of the habitability zone (HZ). Hence, we wish to estimate the UV Index as a function of the stellar parameters for Earth-like planets within the HZ of main sequence stars. The stellar radiation that impinges the surface is calculated by a 1-dimensional radiative transfer model which couples the photo-chemical reactions in the atmosphere. The calculations show that the oxygen and ozone molecules provide a sufficient protection from the stellar radiation, even for hot host stars, as the UV Index can reach a maximal value of 21 units (about twice higher than on Earth). Furthermore, the UV Index is highest on planets which orbit stars with an effective temperature of about 9,000K, and is lower for hotter and colder stars.